Hot-hitting impending free agent Marco Scutaro “would love to” re-sign with Giants

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Marco Scutaro didn’t hit much for the Rockies, batting .271 with a .684 OPS in 95 games, but he’s been on fire since a July 27 trade to the Giants with a .341 batting average, .808 OPS, and 30 RBIs in 44 games.

At the time of the trade Scutaro seemed unhappy to be leaving Colorado, but he’s apparently quickly taken a liking to San Francisco and the impending free agent told Andrew Baggarly of CSNBayArea.com that he “would love to come back here.”

Scutaro indicated that he’d be willing to re-sign before hitting the open market as a free agent and Baggarly writes that “the Giants will make every effort to re-sign Scutaro after this season” because even though he’s 37 years old they lack any other in-house options at second base.

Obviously he’s playing way over his head since coming to the Giants, but Scutaro’s overall numbers this season (.293 batting average, six homers, .724 OPS) are right in line with his career marks. He’s always been a good, solid all-around player and no one loves good, solid veterans more than the Giants.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.