Phil Hughes pitches Yankees past Red Sox

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The Yankees held serve with the Orioles by beating the Red Sox 2-0 in a breezy 3 hours, 11 minutes on Thursday night.

The win kept the Yankees in a tie for first place in the AL East.

It was the lowest scoring game between the two teams in 59 games dating back to Aug. 7, 2009. That contest was scoreless until the bottom of the 15th, when Alex Rodriguez hit a two-run homer to end it.

Phil Hughes was the person most responsible for making this a (relatively) quick affair. He pitched 7 1/3 scoreless innings, walking just one batter in a 95-pitch effort. The Red Sox walked seven, in comparison. Five of those came from starter Felix Doubront, but the lefty turned in a solid outing anyway, allowing two runs in 6 1/3 innings. It was his fourth quality start against the Yankees this year.

Andruw Jones and Derek Jeter knocked in the runs for the Yankees. Jeter was used as a DH tonight after leaving Wednesday’s game with a bone bruise in his left ankle.

The Red Sox were missing their best healthy hitter. Dustin Pedroia left the team last night to be wife his wife when she gave birth today.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.