Orioles beat Rays in 14 innings to complete sweep

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Another day, another one-run victory for the unstoppable Orioles.

Baltimore beat Tampa Bay 3-2 in 14 innings Thursday to complete a three-game sweep. Manny Machado came up big again, delivering a game-winning single after starting the day 0-for-5.

It looked like the Orioles would win it in the 13th, but Chris Archer, making his first major league relief appearance, got three outs to escape a bases-loaded jam. The first out was aided by a five-man infield, as Robert Andino grounded to second and the Rays got the out at home. Archer then struck out pinch-hitter Matt Wieters and Nate McLouth.

Archer went on to take the loss in the 14th. After pitching 3 2/3 scoreless innings, he allowed a walk to Adam Jones and back-to-back singles to Endy Chavez and Machado, ending the game.

Baltimore’s early hero was catcher Taylor Teagarden, as the .119 hitter put the team on the board with a two-run double in the seventh. He has just six hits this season, but they include two homers and three doubles. He had a walkoff homer in his first appearance of the season for the team on July 14.

The Orioles have now won 13 straight extra-inning games. They’re an incredible 27-7 in one-run games this season. At 81-62, they’ve ensured themselves their first .500 season since 1997, not they they seem likely to stop there, as they’re 26-11 since Aug. 3. All that and they’ve still been outscored 643-623 for the season.

As for the Rays, things look pretty bleak. They’re 4 games back of the Orioles in the AL East. They’re also 4 1/2 games behind the A’s and they’ll end the night 3 or 4 back of the Yankees. They’ll have to pass one of those teams and fend off the Angels and Tigers to claim a postseason spot. It’s still doable, but it’s going to take a winning streak.

The Angels are giving managerial candidates a two-hour written test

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Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that the Los Angeles Angels are administering a two-hour written test to managerial candidates. The test presents “questions spanning analytical, interpersonal and game-management aspects of the job,” according to Morosi.

I can’t find any reference to it, but I remember another team doing some form of written testing for managerial candidates within the past couple of years. Questions which presented tactical dilemmas, for example. I don’t recall it being so intense, however. And then, as now, I have a hard time seeing experienced candidates wanting to sit for a two-hour written exam when their track record as a manager, along with an interview to assess compatibility should cover most of it. Just seems like an extension of the current trend in which front offices are taking away authority and, with this, some measure of professional respect, from managers.