Corey Hart on foot problems: “It’s not going to go away”

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Corey Hart, who was already dealing with plantar fasciitis in his left foot, hasn’t played since injuring the foot running the bases Sunday and Adam McCalvy of MLB.com reports that the Brewers first baseman/outfielder “will be fitted with a custom foot support.”

The hope is that will allow Hart to rejoin the lineup relatively soon, although he admitted that “it’s not going to go away” and could be an issue for the remainder of the season:

I already have a tear in there. I think right now we want to get all the initial swelling out so I can get back on the field, and if I fully tear it, I fully tear it. I want to get out there and do what I can. We’re so close to the end right now, and where we are [in the standings], I want to try to play. If I make it worse, I make it worse, and we have the offseason to recover.

The best-case scenario is probably a Friday return, but even then Hart will be one bad step away from missing the rest of the season. He’s hitting .278 with 27 homers and an .855 OPS in 137 games to basically duplicate his numbers from 2010 and 2011, but has attempted just five steals after trying no fewer than 13 steals in any season from 2006-2011.

Report: MLB owners want a 48-game season

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We’ve heard the back and forth between players and owners on money, on safety, on the size and the shape of the season. But not until now have we heard just how little baseball Major League Baseball and its owners actually want: 48 games.

That’s all they want, at least if they have to, as agreed, pay players their prorated salaries on a per-game basis. That’s the report from ESPN’s Jeff Passan, who writes this morning on the state of the current negotiations.

Passan’s article has a lot more than that. It contains a number of financial calculations about how much teams say they stand to lose per game played under any given scenario. That said, given the near total opacity when it comes to owner finances, we have no real way to evaluate the claims. The players have a bit more access to league financials, but even they are reported to be unsatisfied with what the owners have shared in that regard. So, while interesting, nothing Passan presents there is really convincing. It stakes out the positions of the parties but doesn’t really tell us much about the merits.

Which is to say that a 48-game schedule sounds like either (a) a bluff aimed at getting the players to offer financial concessions; or (b) a declaration from the owners that they’d prefer almost no baseball if it means that they have to lose any money. The whole “we’ll happily take the benefits of a good market but won’t bother if there’s a chance we might lose money” approach I’ve lambasted in this space before.

We’ll see soon which it is.