The Nationals can’t pay for late Metro service because of … MLB policy?

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We’ve talked before about the Nationals Metro problem. As in, the Metro is really the best way to get to Nats Park but, because it closes at midnight, it often causes fans to choose between staying for the whole game and leaving early to get the train.  And how, because of late starting playoff games, this may become a bigger problem in the future. And how, if the Nats wanted to, they could do what other teams in D.C. do and enter into a contract with WMATA to keep Metro open late on game nights at the team’s expense.

The Nats thus far have refused to do that.  We learn today, however, that the reason for this is not that they don’t want to pay. Rather, because of league policy:

OK, then. Can someone at MLB explain to me what this league policy is, why it was developed and where it has been employed before? Because I’m unaware of any other city where early-closing mass transit is an issue for ballgames. At least a problem large enough to where it has been suggested that teams pay to keep it open before.

But I do love the concern over a “precedent” being set.  What’s the precedent the league is worried about?  A baseball team, for once in its friggin’ life, having to actually pay for a service that directly benefits them and their fans as opposed to having the local government cover it?

Video: Ramon Torres hits little league home run in first at-bat of season

Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
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The Royals recalled infielder Ramon Torres from Triple-A Omaha on Saturday. He didn’t get into a game until starting Thursday night’s game against the Rangers, batting ninth.

In the top of the second inning, facing Austin Bibens-Dirkx, Torres laced a single up the middle. Center fielder Delino DeShields charged in on it, attempting to keep Ryan Goins at second base, but the ball went right past his glove, through his legs, and nearly trickled all the way to the warning track. Goins scored easily and Torres was waved home, too. He managed to narrowly beat the throw, touching home plate with his left hand on a head-first slide.

The play was officially scored a single and a three-base error. Torres wasn’t credited with an RBI on the play. But at least the Royals got two runs out of it.