Chipper Jones makes his last visit to New York

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Memories, Like the corners of my mind …  Misty water-colored memories Of the way we were

Chipper Jones makes his final trip to New York to play the Mets this weekend.  I’m seriously wondering how the reception is going to go. On the one hand there is probably no player as hated by Mets fans over the past 20 years — and Jones has never shied from taunting them — but there also tends to be this whole grudging respect thing that happens to old adversaries.

If I had to guess, I’d say it’ll be three days of merciless “LARRY!” taunts, followed by a nice but not necessarily enthusiastic ovation at the end of Sunday’s game.  As for the gift the Mets will give him — because apparently every team is required to do this for reasons that elude me — I would suggest a paternity test, so that Mets fans might, once and for all, accept that Chipper is their daddy.

Anyway, Dave O’Brien has a nice piece up over at the AJC today walking us back through the Chipper-Mets memories.  Reminding us — as so many people I talk to seem to have forgotten — that the mammo four-Chipper-yicketty sweep of the Mets by the Braves in September 1999 took place in Atlanta, not Shea Stadium.  I bet if you asked 100 Braves and Mets fans about that, most would say it happened in New York, such is the legend by now.

Players’ offer reportedly not going over well with owners

Rob Manfred
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Last night it was reported that the Players Union had made an offer to Major League Baseball and the owners regarding plans for a 2020 season. The offer, which was in part counteroffer to the owners’ previous offer, part new proposals of its own, involved a 114-game season with an end date on October 31, a playoff expansion for two years, the right for players to opt out of the season over health concerns, and a potential deferral of 2020 salaries if the postseason were to be canceled.

How’s that sitting with the owners? Not great, folks.

Evan Drellich of The Athletic reported this morning that the owners want a shorter schedule than the 114 games the players proposed, likely because they want to increase the odds that they can get to a postseason before a potential second wave COVID-19 outbreak occurs, as many experts expect it will. The owners also, not surprisingly, still want salary reductions, which the players have not addressed due to their contention that the matter was settled. Drellich says that the players’ offer “hasn’t been rejected yet but that’s inevitable.”

Bob Klapisch of the Newark Star-Ledger is more blunt:

The sides are, as Drellich notes, still talking. It would appear, however, that the owners tack of negotiating through the media is continuing on as well.