UPDATE: John Henry says Bobby V. is safe for the season

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UPDATE:  OK, Valentine is safe for the season:

 

October 1, though? Well. Stay tuned.

8: 27 AM: Bobby Valentine:  The Emperor’s coming here?
Larry Lucchino: That is correct, Commander. And, he is most displeased with your apparent lack of progress.
Bobby Valentine: We shall double our efforts.
Larry Lucchino: I hope so, Commander, for your sake. The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am.

With the team in tatters on the West Coast — six straight losses, outscored in the six games by an astounding 54-15 — the Boston Herald’s Michael Silverman reported Monday morning that owner John Henry and general manager Ben Cherington have flown to Seattle, where the Sox will begin a three-game series against the Mariners today.

There have been no votes of confidence or anything like that. And there have been no real justifications for one even if there had been. It seems inevitable that Bobby Valentine is a one-and-done manager for the Red Sox, even if what has happened this year cannot be fairly laid at his feet.  He was dropped in to an untenable position to being with in a job unsuited to his strengths.

Still, failure is failure and it’s hard to envision a situation in which Valentine is the manager for this team in 2013.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.