Andy Pettitte almost ready to face live hitters

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Mike Mazzeo of ESPN New York has the update:

Yankees left-hander Andy Pettitte threw a 35-pitch bullpen session off the mound on Sunday, and says he feels like he’s “over the hump.”

Pettitte, on the disabled list since June 27 with a fractured left ankle, came out of the session “feeling good” and said his command was good as well.

The veteran southpaw told reporters after Sunday’s workout that he wants to throw live batting practice “as quick as possible,” and manager Joe Girardi later suggested that it could happen within the next three days if there are no issues with lingering soreness.

Petttitte is still on track to return to the Yankees’ starting rotation by the middle of September. He had a 3.22 ERA, 1.09 WHIP and 59/15 K/BB ratio in 58 2/3 innings before fracturing his left ankle near the end of June.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.