Tim Stauffer undergoes elbow surgery

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Tim Stauffer’s 2012 season is officially over, as Corey Brock of MLB.com reports that he underwent surgery yesterday to repair the flexor tendon in his right elbow. Padres manager Bud Black said that he should be ready for spring training next year.

Stauffer was originally expected to be the Padres’ Opening Day starter, but he ended up making just one start in the big leagues this season. After beginning the year on the disabled list, he made his season debut against the Nationals on May 14 and gave up four runs (three earned) over five innings. However, he was placed right back on the disabled list after feeling more discomfort in his elbow. He finally decided to have surgery after being pulled from a rehab assignment earlier this month.

Stauffer made $3.2 million this season and is arbitration-eligible again this winter, so he figures to be a non-tender candidate this winter. The 29-year-old right-hander will likely have to settle for a one-year “prove it” contract, but after posting a 3.73 ERA over 185 2/3 innings in 2011, there should be plenty of teams willing to take a chance on him.

Tim Tebow homers in spring training game

Tim Tebow
Mark Brown/Getty Images
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Mets minor league outfielder Tim Tebow hit a two-run home run during Tuesday afternoon’s Grapefruit League game against the Tigers. It’s his first spring training home run since beginning his professional baseball career in late 2016.

Tebow, 32, is, of course, a former college football legend. He had a much-anticipated NFL career that ended up brief and disappointing, prompting a change of vocation. Tebow was passable with Double-A Binghamton in 2018, but the Mets promoted him to Triple-A for the 2019 season anyway. That was a mistake. Through 264 plate appearances, Tebow hit .163/.240/.255, ranking as the worst hitter in the minor leagues.

Tebow also walked along with the homer in three plate appearances on Tuesday. While it’s a solid early showing, Tebow participating with the other big leaguers or soon-to-be big leaguers in spring training is something of a sideshow. If he were a regular ballplayer working his way up the ranks, he likely would have been cut after last season. He certainly wouldn’t have been given an invitation to big league camp the next year.

There are aspects of the Tebow situation to respect: that he’s athletic and dedicated enough to attempt a professional career in another sport, for example. He moves tickets and merchandise. But one can’t help but wonder about the roster spot he’s holding that would otherwise go to a more deserving player.