NBC SportsTalk: Brian Cashman’s irresponsible PED comments

20 Comments

Joe Sheehan and I joined Erik Kuselias on SportsTalk last night and one of the segments was about Brian Cashman’s lack of surprise over Bartolo Colon and Melky Cabrera’s positive PED tests.  Which is fine as far as it goes. It may be a rare bit of candor from an executive on the topic of PEDs.

But Erik, Joe and I all agree that it’s unseemly and, in a lot of ways, cynical for a guy like Cashman to say such things.  My biggest beef: pointing to the performance spikes these guys had is misleading, because Cashman knows as well as anyone that there have been way more Guillermo Motas and Marlon Byrds caught taking banned things out there — dudes trying to hang on or get over the hump — than there have been positive statistical outliers caught.  Indeed, we have all manner of fluke seasons in baseball history that have nothing to do with PEDs. Melky and Bartolo may have been riding dirty, but let’s not make every guy who has a flukish year a suspect.

And yeah, I dopped a Norm Cash reference. Stopped the conversation cold.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

Getty Images
15 Comments

Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.