The Rays have lost four 1-0 games in August

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It has been observed many times over the years that the results of one-run games hinge largely on luck. A bad bounce here or there. One pitch released just so. One little flare. Just one! A gorp, a groundball — a groundball with eyes — a dying quail, just one more dying quail … and a tie game can turn into a one-run win or loss.

It observed just this morning by one of our fine readers that the Orioles have been crazy-lucky in this regard this year, as they have won 13 straight one-run games. “The Orioles are so lucky that they crap leprechauns,” as it was so eloquently put.

The opposite can be said about the Tampa Bay Rays.  They lost 1-0 last night. Which is nothing new, as they have lost four 1-0 games in the month of August alone. That’s the most 1-0 games a team has lost since 1969. It’s the most an AL team has lost in a month since 1955.

Now, my earlier comments notwithstanding, that’s not all about luck. Losing a 7-6 ballgame is different than losing a 1-0 ballgame in some ways, it seems. When you get shut out a lot it suggests your offense stinks. And the Rays offense kind of stinks compared to the rest of the league. Behind them in the AL are only the Royals, the Indians the Mariners and the A’s.

The Rays are a good team, of course. But this is really something.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.