Minus Tony La Russa, Cardinals still league’s biggest dipwads

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Yeah, Josh Harrison bowled over Yadier Molina in the second inning Tuesday, knocking the St. Louis catcher out of the game soreness in his back, neck and shoulders. It was a violent collision, and the Cardinals weren’t happy about seeing maybe their best player leave with an injury.

So, of course, Jake Westbrook threw at Harrison three innings later, plunking him in the leg with a first-pitch fastball.

And, for that, I’m calling the Cardinals losers. There was nothing old school about it. It was just a whiny team not having things go its way and deciding to get revenge the only way it knew how.

Take it out on Harrison? Ridiculous. Molina was sitting there right in front of the plate, low to the ground, ready to absorb the collision. Harrison had absolutely nowhere else to go. Watch the play and tell me what Harrison should have done differently?

Look, I’m not a fan of this type of play. I’ve railed against it on this blog before. If I had my way, plate blocking would be illegal. But it isn’t, and this kind of thing is going to happen from time to time.

There’s nothing dirty about what Harrison did. If Harrison happened to be a Cardinal, every one of his teammates would have applauded his effort. He didn’t deserve a fastball to the thigh for it, and it’s mind-boggling that Westbrook wasn’t ejected for one of the most obviously intentional HBPs you’ll ever see.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.