Must-Click Link: the subtle racial bias of baseball broadcasters

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We’ve talked casually for years about how white athletes are described in different terms than black or Latino athletes. The whites are smart, gritty and hard-working, the blacks are naturally gifted or are described in terms of raw athleticism and the Latinos are dumb or lazy. You’ve heard this kind of noise before. We all have, even if it’s extremely rare for so fine a point to be put on it.

It’s a subject worthy of more rigorous observation, so recently Seth Amitin of IGN.com and Dingersblog.com researched the topic. The results, in depth (though there is a longer version I’ll have my hands on soon) are published over at The Atlantic today:

Are sports announcers guilty of this sort of bias, and are viewers unknowingly absorbing them?

To answer this question we dispatched a group of ten people to combine to watch every single television broadcast of a Major League Baseball game for a week last season—95 games total, and nearly 200 separate broadcasts, since nearly every team fields its own broadcast for every game. We analyzed these games for the words announcers used to describe players, with the goal of finding out whether broadcasters spoke about white players and players of color differently.

Definitely worth a read. Indeed, if you’re white, the only excuse not to read it is that you’re suffering from a nagging injury that we all know you’d play through if you could. If not, it’s because you’re a lazy clubhouse cancer squandering your talents.

Mariners sign Ichiro to a minor league deal

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USA Today’s Bob Nightengale reports that the Mariners will sign Ichiro Suzuki to a minor-league deal. If he makes the roster he’ll make $750,000. At least until he retires.

I say that because it seems quite clear that the idea here, telegraphed since last season, is to activate Ichiro for the Mariners’ series against the Oakland Athletics in Tokyo on March 20-21 and for hoopla surrounding it all. The Mariners and A’s will have a 28-man roster for that series, which is officially part of the regular season schedule, but it will be pared back down to 25 once games begin in the United States.

Suzuki, 45, hit .205/.255/.205 in 47 plate appearances through May 2 last season, at which point he agreed to be deactivated to join the Mariners’ front office. Many assumed Ichiro would announce his retirement later that season or during the offseason, but the Japan Series soon crystalized as an obvious way for him to offer his final farewell to both his American and his Japanese fans.

Unless of course he goes 6-10 with three doubles in that series, at which point everyone will be tempted to keep him on the roster past Japan. Which, given the Mariners’ rebuild and likely poor performance this coming season, wouldn’t exactly be hurting anyone, would it?