Adrian Gonzalez on why the Boston media didn’t like him

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Adrian Gonzalez is really, really happy to be back in California. And he’s comfortable enough there to throw some bombs back in Boston’s direction. Dylan Hernandez of the L.A. Times reports:

As for why the Boston media didn’t take to him, he said, “They didn’t like that I was a calm person. I won’t throw my helmet, I won’t scream, I won’t use bad words if I strike out. That’s what they want over there … They took me over there and I didn’t change. My intensity, how I prepared, everything was the same. When they took me over there, they took me over there to drive in runs. And I did that.”

I’ll agree that the Boston media prefers it when guys are more interesting, but unless I missed something I never sensed that anyone had it in for Gonzalez especially. He caught heat, understandably so, with that whole Kelly Shoppach/text message fiasco. When he had a poor first half of this season it was noted. But it’s not like he had people down on him like Beckett or Crawford or Buchholz or anyone.

It was obviously not a good fit for him, both culturally and competitively — Hernandez notes how the Green Monster hurt Gonzalez instead of helped him like many thought it would — but there are guys who have gotten a way harder time thrown their way in Boston than Gonzalez.  Indeed, if it wasn’t for the opportunity to dump Beckett and Crawford in this deal, it seems like Boston may very well have wanted to keep him around.

MLB and MLBPA announce first set of COVID-19 test results

MLB COVID-19 test results
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images
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On Friday evening, Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association announced the first set of results for COVID-19 testing as part of the mandatory intake screening process under MLB’s COVID-19 Health Monitoring & Testing Plan. Per Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle, the Athletics are not part of this data because their testing has not yet been completed.

There were 38 positive tests, accounting for 1.2% of the 3,185 samples collected and tested. 31 of the 38 individuals who tested positive are players. 19 different teams had one or more individuals test positive.

Sports Illustrated’s Emma Baccellieri notes that the positive test rate in the U.S. nationally is 8.3 percent. The NBA’s positive test rate was 7.1 percent. MLB’s positive test rate is well below average. This doesn’t necessarily mean that anything is wrong with MLB’s testing or that it’s an atypical round of testing. Rather, MLB’s testing population may more closely represent the U.S. population as a whole. Currently, because testing is still somewhat limited, those who have taken tests have tended to be those exhibiting symptoms or those who have been around others who have tested positive. If every single person in the U.S. took a test, the positive test rate would likely come in at a much lower number.

Several players who tested positive have given their consent for their identities to be made known. Those are: Delino DeShields (link), Brett Martin (link), Edward Colina, Nick Gordon, and Willians Astudillo (link). Additionally, Red Sox lefty Eduardo Rodríguez has not shown up to Red Sox camp yet because he has been around someone who tested positive, per The Athletic’s Jen McCaffrey.