Settling the Score: Friday’s results

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Zack Greinke finally resembled the ace pitcher the Angels thought they were getting at the trade deadline, limiting the Tigers to one run over 7 2/3 innings last night as part of a 2-1 victory.

Greinke was fantastic, allowing just five hits while striking out five and walking two. He held the Tigers off the board completely until a solo home run by Miguel Cabrera with two outs in the eighth inning chased him from the ballgame. Cabrera, who left Thursday’s game after tweaking his right ankle, also had a double in the sixth inning.

It was a very encouraging performance by Greinke, who had allowed 22 runs over 32 innings (6.19 ERA) over his previous five starts as a member of the Angels. The impending free agent now has a 3.87 ERA on the year.

Winners of four straight, the Angels are finally starting to get on a bit of a roll. They’ll enter play Saturday at 66-60 on the year and currently sit 8 1/2 games behind the first-place Rangers in the American League West and 2 1/2 games back for the American League Wild Card.

Your Friday box scores:

Rockies 3, Cubs 5

Yankees 3, Indians 1

Nationals 2, Phillies 4

Angels 2, Tigers 1

Brewers 6, Pirates 5

Cardinals 8, Reds 5

Royals 3, Red Sox 4

Astros 3, Mets 1

Blue Jays 4, Orioles 6

Athletics 5, Rays 4

Twins 0, Rangers 8

Mariners 8, White Sox 9

Padres 5, Diamondbacks 0

Marlins 4, Dodgers 11

Braves 3, Giants 5

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.