Michael Schwimer is not happy with the Phillies right now

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The Phillies optioned right-handed reliever Michael Schwimer to Triple-A Lehigh Valley today in order to make room for Jeremy Horst’s return from the paternity leave list. That’s hardly headline news. But the story behind the roster move is a bit more interesting.

Here’s the scoop from Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com:

According to multiple sources, the demotion did not sit well with Schwimer. Two sources said the pitcher had recently complained of a sore arm and believed he should have been placed on the disabled list instead of being sent to the minors. Schwimer apparently made his feelings known to club personnel.

It is against Major League Baseball rules to send an injured player to the minors during the season. Of course, the definition of “injured player” can be subjective.

The usually gregarious Schwimer declined to speak with reporters as he strutted out of the clubhouse before batting practice Thursday. One person who had spoken to Schwimer said the pitcher was “making noise about his arm hurting and getting a second opinion.”

Players who are on the disabled list continue to receive major-league pay and service time, so there are motivations at play here that we usually don’t think about in the day-to-day routine of a baseball season. Phillies assistant general manager Scott Proefrock declined to comment on the situation, but if Schwimer continues to insist that he’s injured, it could open the door to a grievance being filed.

Schwimer, 26, has a 4.46 ERA and 36/16 K/BB ratio over 34 1/3 innings with the Phillies this season.

Tom Ricketts says the Cubs don’t have any more money

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Cubs owner Tom Ricketts met the media in Mesa, Arizona today and said a couple of things that were fun.

First, he addressed the controversy that arose earlier this month when emails of his father’s — family patriarch Joe Ricketts — were leaked, showing him forwarding and approvingly commenting on racist jokes. Ricketts apologized for those serving as a “distraction” for the Cubs which, OK. He also said “Those aren’t the values our family was raised with… I never heard my father say anything remotely racist.” If you choose to believe that a 77-year-old conservative guy who loves racist emails — who once spearheaded an anti-Obama ad campaign that required a “literate African-American” as its spokesman — hasn’t said racist stuff a-plenty, that’s between you and your credulity.

More relevant to the 2019 Cubs is this:

The Cubs aren’t in the same position as some other contenders in that (a) they don’t have a cheap payroll; and (b) are not obvious candidates for the big free agents like Harper or Machado, but I still find that comment pretty rich for an owner of one of baseball’s marquee franchises in a non-salary cap league. If nothing else, it’s an admission by Ricketts that he, like the other owners, consider the Luxury Tax to be a defacto salary cap.