So, Johan Santana’s no-hitter was still worth it, right?

19 Comments

Never really a workhorse, Johan Santana threw 134 pitches in his no-hitter on June 1, topping his previous career high by nine. Coming back from shoulder surgery, he hadn’t thrown more than 108 pitches in a start this season, as the Mets were being extra cautious with him until the night he had a chance to accomplish something no other pitcher in franchise history had done.

We all know what happened next. Santana has made 10 starts since the no-hitter and gone 3-7 with an 8.27 ERA. On Wednesday, the Mets made the decision to place him on the DL with back inflammation, ending his season. The league  hit .327/.377/.587 with 13 homers off him in 49 innings during the worst stretch of his career.

The Mets were 29-23 at the conclusion of the no-hitter, putting them just one game back of the Nationals in the NL East. They’re 28-43 since. At 57-66, they’re 20 games back of the Nationals and 10 games out of the second wild card spot.

So, it was worth it, I’d say. Let’s face it: even if Santana were 7-3 instead of 3-7 since the no-hitter, the Mets wouldn’t be in the race. That’s not to say his struggles are completely isolated from the team as a whole’s; he’s definitely added extra strain to the bullpen with his short outings and he did miss a couple of starts while on the disabled list. But the Mets still weren’t going to be in the think of the playoff hunt with a good Johan.

No, we don’t even know for sure that Santana’s problems began with the no-hitter, but it would be a pretty big coincidence. Fortunately for the Mets, he hasn’t complained of arm woes. His first DL stint was due to an ankle injury, and now it’s the back being used as an excuse. Certainly, arm fatigue has been a factor, but with the Mets shutting him down, there’s no chance of anything else going wrong.

Six months ago, the Mets really had no idea what they’d get from Santana this year. I’d imagine they have to be pleased with the results, even though he’s now finished up at 6-9 with a 4.85 ERA. Not only did they get one lasting memory, but he had enough success early on that they can be pretty confident about an improved showing in 2013.

Clayton Kershaw might return to the Dodgers’ rotation next week

AP Images
Leave a comment

Dodgers southpaw Clayton Kershaw is nearing his return to the mound, according to club manager Dave Roberts. Both Kershaw (left biceps tendinitis) and fellow lefty Rich Hill (left middle finger blister) are scheduled to toss simulated games on Saturday; depending on the outcome, Roberts says Kershaw could forgo a minor league assignment and slot back into the rotation by Thursday.

Kershaw, 30, was diagnosed with biceps tendinitis as the team closed out their Mexico Series at the start of the month. He has not made a start in several weeks, but was finally able to resume throwing on Sunday and managed to get through two successful bullpen sessions. Though Dodgers’ ace hasn’t been completely injury-free over his 11-year career in the majors, this is the first significant issue he’s had with his pitching arm so far. The team is expected to take every precaution with the lefty, and will likely limit him to just four innings during Saturday’s simulated game.

Prior to his injury, Kershaw was working on another dominant run with the club, sporting a 2.86 ERA, 2.0 BB/9 and 9.8 SO/9 through his first 44 innings of the season. While Kershaw, Hill and left-handed starter Hyun-Jin Ryu served their respective terms on the disabled list this month, the Dodgers utilized a combination of relievers Ross Stripling and Brock Stewart, both of whom impressed during their limited time in the rotation.