Injured youth receives $14.5 million after being hit by liner

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The family of Steven Domalewski received $14.5 million to settle its lawsuit with Little League Baseball, The Sports Authority and Hillerich and Bradsby on Wednesday.

Domalewski, then nine, was struck in the chest by a line drive while pitching in a Police Athletic League game in 2006. He went into cardiac arrest, and while paramedics were able to get him breathing again, he was left with brain damage after going 15-20 minutes without oxygen.

“The Domalewskis are still saddened by the tragic events of June 2006, but this settlement provides them with some relief and comfort that Steven will get the care he needs for the rest of his life,” said the family’s attorney, Ernest Fronzuto. “He still can’t perform any functions of daily life on his own.”

Although Domalewski wasn’t playing in a Little League game, Little League Baseball did sanction the Louisville Slugger metal bat that was used to hit the liner. The Sports Authority sold the bat, and Hillerich and Bradsby manufactured it. Now each is out millions of dollars because of some very bad luck.

Of course, young Steven’s life was ruined by the incident. Ideally, this money will be used to make sure he’s provided for and treated well. Still, one imagines there will be enough left over for shiny new cars and island getaways for the family and lawyers.

Marlins unveil what they’re putting in the space where the home run sculpture used to be

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. In October they announced that it would, in fact, be moving out to a plaza or the parking lot or someplace you’re unlikely to ever see it because who goes to Marlins games?

Today we got a tease of what the Marlins are doing with the space the sculpture is vacating:

It was only a matter of time before that green wall went away. There are a lot of things I like about the overall aesthetic of Marlins Park, but almost all of them are because of their novelty. Jeff Loria was bad for a lot of reasons, but one of the few good things he did was eschew nostalgia and traditionalism with the ballpark. Nostalgia and traditionalism, unfortunately, is the straw that stirs baseball’s drink, so any “weird” colors or flourishes were gonna be beat out of that place as the years went on. It was inevitable.

As for the “three-tier social space,” here’s hoping that tickets for it are cheap or the Marlins start winning ballgames soon, because the Marlins can’t really fill their existing spectator spaces now.