Could Dodger Stadium be shrinking soon?

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This is not a news flash or anything, but getting into Dodger Stadium is a gigantic pain in the butt. While gorgeous, the Chavez Ravine location makes it not too easily accessible, and when you combine that with L.A. traffic and the fact that 56,000 people can fit in the place and really only have one parking option — a giant lot — it’s a recipe for madness and gridlock.

Bill Plaschke describes the scene for last night’s sold out Giants-Dodgers game — just chaos — and suggests a possible solution:

The Dodgers need to shrink the stadium. Fewer fans, fewer cars. Shrink it by replacing a bunch of seats with patios and railings and the kinds of restaurants that are landmarks in other stadiums. Transform the mammoth into a more intimate creature that has been so popular in other cities. Shrink it to also increase comfort, ambience and buzz.

And it’s not just one columnist’s idea. Plaschke quotes team president Stan Kasten, who talks as if it’s something the Dodgers are seriously considering. So seriously that one gets the distinct impression that it’s a plan of which Plashcke was made privy at some point and was waiting for a sell-out in order to float the plan out there.

If done right — and the pleasing Dodgers Stadium aesthetics are maintained, which some other plans have decidedly not done — it could work. 56,000 fans is an awful lot for baseball these days. If you open up the place a bit, lose some seats and add some other revenue-generating amenities and concessions you could definitely have something nice on your hands.

I think it’ll still be a pain cramming, say, 45,000 fans into the Dodger Stadium parking lots, but then again, they’ve been doing that for 50 years.

Marcus Stroman dealing with blister again

Marcus Stroman
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Blue Jays right-hander Marcus Stroman might be headed to the disabled list soon, manager John Gibbons told reporters following Friday’s rain-shortened loss to the Yankees. The righty lasted just four innings on the mound before calling it a night, and gave up five runs, six hits and two walks in a performance that Gibbons claimed was at least partially affected by recurring blister issues on his right middle finger. Now, it looks like he might be removed from the rotation for some much-needed rest and rehabilitation; if so, it’ll be his second such stint this year.

Stroman, 27, has struggled to return the kind of winning record and sub-4.00 ERA that characterized his previous seasons with the club, mostly due to the combined seven weeks he missed with blisters on his throwing hand and chronic fatigue in his right shoulder. In a recent start against the Rays, things got even more gruesome when his blister appeared to start bleeding in the middle of his outing and MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm notes that the wound has constantly interfered with the right-hander’s pitch selection and delivery. When healthy, Stroman has managed a 4-8 record through 18 starts in 2018 with a career-worst 5.27 ERA, 3.2 BB/9 and 6.8 SO/9 in 100 2/3 innings. This will be the first year since 2015 in which he has not logged at least 200 innings in a single season.

While Stroman may not need an extended stay on the DL before he returns to the mound, it’s not clear what kind of timetable the Blue Jays expect for his recovery. He’s been the second-most valuable starter (behind the now-traded J.A. Happ) in a rotation that currently ranks 17th in the majors with a combined 4.90 ERA and 6.8 fWAR.