Bobby Valentine sticks up for Adrian Gonzalez, both get tossed

26 Comments

Does a double ejection count as a bonding experience?

After Adrian Gonzalez was tossed for arguing a pitch in the eighth inning Wednesday against Baltimore, Bobby Valentine took up the complaint on his behalf and was also ejected. The Red Sox went on to lose the game 5-3.

It was just the second career ejection for the usually mild-mannered Gonzalez. At least, mild-mannered on the field. Gonzalez was reportedly the ringleader in calling the meeting that asked for Valentine’s ouster as Red Sox manager, though that’s a claim he denied Wednesday.

Gonzalez’s complaint was that he was quick-pitched by Orioles reliever Pedro Strop on his groundout, a fact that Strop acknowledged after the game. “I haven’t got told that it’s illegal,” he told MLB.com’s Brittany Ghiroli after the game. “So, if it’s been working, I’m going to keep doing it.”

Gonzalez said the pitch should have been ruled a ball, WEEI reports.

“My problem with that is that they all interpret their own way,” Gonzalez said. “Frankie [Morales] does it earlier in the year and they call it a ball. When I talked to the umpire that day they said the hitter wasn’t ready to hit. That’s what we base it on. I wasn’t ready to hit. That’s what I went back to tell [home plate umpire Mike Everitt].”

Valentine agreed, arguing the quick pitch is “dangerous.”

Perhaps it’s a case of too little, too late, but Valentine backing up one of his best players certainly can’t hurt his cause. Too bad it came in yet another loss.

Video: Tony Kemp makes a sensational catch to halt two-out rally by Red Sox

Jason Miller/Getty Images
3 Comments

After scoring two quick runs against Astros starter Dallas Keuchel in Game 3 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening, the Red Sox offense threatened again in the third. J.D. Martinez and Xander Bogaerts drew back-to-back two-out walks, bringing up Steve Pearce, who hits lefties quite well. With a 2-2 count, Pearce lifted an 81 MPH slider towards the Crawford Boxes in right field, a mere 315 feet away from home plate. Left fielder Tony Kemp, listed at 5’6″, ranged back, timed his jump and crashed into the scoreboard while holding onto the ball. The catch prevented two runs from scoring which would have extended the Astros’ deficit. Instead, the score remained 2-1.

Kemp’s catch will certainly be in the running for the best play of the postseason.