Bobby Valentine sticks up for Adrian Gonzalez, both get tossed

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Does a double ejection count as a bonding experience?

After Adrian Gonzalez was tossed for arguing a pitch in the eighth inning Wednesday against Baltimore, Bobby Valentine took up the complaint on his behalf and was also ejected. The Red Sox went on to lose the game 5-3.

It was just the second career ejection for the usually mild-mannered Gonzalez. At least, mild-mannered on the field. Gonzalez was reportedly the ringleader in calling the meeting that asked for Valentine’s ouster as Red Sox manager, though that’s a claim he denied Wednesday.

Gonzalez’s complaint was that he was quick-pitched by Orioles reliever Pedro Strop on his groundout, a fact that Strop acknowledged after the game. “I haven’t got told that it’s illegal,” he told MLB.com’s Brittany Ghiroli after the game. “So, if it’s been working, I’m going to keep doing it.”

Gonzalez said the pitch should have been ruled a ball, WEEI reports.

“My problem with that is that they all interpret their own way,” Gonzalez said. “Frankie [Morales] does it earlier in the year and they call it a ball. When I talked to the umpire that day they said the hitter wasn’t ready to hit. That’s what we base it on. I wasn’t ready to hit. That’s what I went back to tell [home plate umpire Mike Everitt].”

Valentine agreed, arguing the quick pitch is “dangerous.”

Perhaps it’s a case of too little, too late, but Valentine backing up one of his best players certainly can’t hurt his cause. Too bad it came in yet another loss.

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.