Alfonso Soriano isn’t interested in replacing Melky Cabrera

15 Comments

Alfonso Soriano made it known before the trade deadline that he wasn’t interested in a trade to the Giants. Asked again today about the possibility of a move to San Francisco in light of Melky Cabrera’s regular season-ending suspension, Soriano replied “I don’t think so,” CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney reports.

Soriano has cleared waivers, just as everyone knew he would. However, with full no-trade protection, he still controls his destiny in Chicago. The Cubs would be agreeable to paying a hefty portion of the approx. $42 million he’s due through 2014 in order to send him elsewhere, but finding a team that both wants him and that Soriano would be willing to go to has proven to difficult so far.

The Giants could certainly use him, given that they’re currently staring down a future with Gregor Blanco and maybe some Xavier Nady, Justin Christian or Marco Scutaro in left field. Soriano has hit .264/.319/.490 with 21 homers and 71 RBI for the Cubs this year. His totals would rank first on the Giants in homers and second behind Buster Posey in RBI.

Alas, it’s probably not meant to be.

Nationals’ starting pitching carrying them into World Series

Michael Reaves/Getty Images
Leave a comment

In my postseason preview at the end of September, I listed the Nationals’ starting rotation as a strength and their bullpen as a weakness. Anyone who had followed the club this season could have told you that. Even the Nats are aware of it as manager Dave Martinez has leaned on his rotation to hide his sometimes unreliable ‘pen.

In Game 1 of the NLDS against the Dodgers, Martinez was burned by his bullpen as Tanner Rainey, Fernando Rodney, and Hunter Strickland combined to allow six base runners and four runs. Martinez used ace Max Scherzer in relief in Game 2, sandwiched by Sean Doolittle and Daniel Hudson. Starter Patrick Corbin pitched in relief in Game 3 and it backfired, but the bullpen after Corbin continued to allow more runs — three officially, but Wander Suero allowed two inherited runners to score on a three-run homer by Max Muncy. Martinez only had to rely on Doolittle and Hudson in Game 4 and he again went to Corbin in relief in Game 5.

The strategy was clear: use the actual bullpen as little as possible. If Martinez absolutely has to, Doolittle and Hudson get top priory by a country mile, followed by a starter, then the rest of the bullpen.

Thankfully for Martinez and the Nationals, the starting pitching has done yeoman’s work in the NLCS, jumping out to a three games to none series lead over the Cardinals. Aníbal Sánchez famously brought a no-hit bid into the eighth inning of Game 1, finally relenting a two-out single to José Martínez before his night was over. Doolittle got the final four outs in the 2-0 win. Max Scherzer flirted with a no-hitter in his Game 2 start as well, losing it when Paul Goldschmidt led off the seventh with a single. He was erased on an inning-ending double play. Doolittle, Corbin, and Hudson got the final six outs in the 3-1 victory.

It was more of the same in Game 3. While Stephen Strasburg didn’t flirt with a no-hitter, he was dominant over seven innings, yielding one unearned run on seven hits with no walks and 12 strikeouts. The Nats’ offense woke up, amassing eight runs through seven innings which allowed Martinez to give his main relief guys a night off. Rodney and Rainey each pitched a perfect inning of relief with two strikeouts in low-leverage situations, their first appearances in the NLCS.

The Nationals starting pitching has been outstanding by itself, but it has also had the secondary effect of allowing Martinez to hide his team’s biggest weakness. Now Martinez just has to hope for more of the same for one more game, then at least four more in the World Series.