Fastest man in baseball Billy Hamilton ‘possibly’ September call-up for Reds

22 Comments

At this point there’s little question about whether the fastest man in baseball, Reds prospect Billy Hamilton, will break the minor-league stolen base record held by Vince Coleman.

Coleman set the record with 145 steals in 1983 and Hamilton already has 133 steals with 23 games remaining.

Hamilton’s season at Double-A ends on September 3, so once he’s done shattering the record will the Reds call him up to be a pinch-runner down the stretch? Tom Groeschen of the Cincinnati Enquirer asked Dusty Baker that question today and the manager hinted pretty strongly that Hamilton will be in the majors next month:

Possibly. Speed’s always an asset. Speed kills. I remember the Cardinals with Willie McGee, Vince Coleman and Ozzie [Smith]. Man. That was their slogan, speed kills.

Baker also praised Hamilton’s development beyond the ridiculous steal total:

You’ve got to be able to play your position. You’ve got to be able to hit and get on base. You’ve got to be fundamentally sound. He’s come a long ways in a short period of time. You’ve got to have a total game, which he has, and he’s chipping off the rough edges around his game.

Toss in the fact that Hamilton is hitting .312 with a .409 on-base percentage in 110 games overall this season and that certainly sounds like someone Baker would like to have on his bench.

Kenley Jansen expected to be OK for spring training after heart procedure

Kenley Jansen
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Building on a report from early September, Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen is slated to undergo a heart procedure on November 26. The estimated recovery time ranges from two to eight weeks, according to comments Jansen made Friday, and he expects to be able to rejoin the team once spring training rolls around next year.

Jansen, 31, was first diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat in 2011 and missed significant time during the 2011, 2012, and 2018 seasons due to the condition. He underwent his first surgery to correct the irregularity in 2012, but suffered recurring symptoms that could not be treated long-term with the heart medication and blood thinners that had been prescribed to him. Scarier still was the “atrial fibrillation episode” that the reliever experienced during a road trip to Colorado in August; per MLB.com’s Ken Gurnick, the high altitude exacerbated his heart condition and left him susceptible to future episodes in the event that he chose to return to the Rockies’ Coors Field.

Heart issues notwithstanding, the veteran right-hander pitched through his third straight All-Star season in 2018. Overall, he saw a downward trend in most of his stats, but still collected 38 saves in 59 opportunities and finished the season with a respectable 3.01 ERA, 2.1 BB/9 and 10.3 SO/9 through 71 2/3 innings. In October, he helped carry the Dodgers to their second consecutive pennant and wrapped up his sixth postseason run with three saves, two blown saves, and a 1.69 ERA across 10 2/3 innings.