Angels catcher Bobby Wilson quit Twitter because of the criticism

20 Comments

Before you say anything, yes, it is a slow news day. Believe me, if there were three-team trades and actual baseball drama going on at the moment, I’d be writing about it. But there isn’t, so you get more stuff like this:

Bobby Wilson spent his off day Thursday lamenting all the guff he’s taken as the Angels’ backup catcher. He got so tired of it he quit Twitter.

This is what he tweeted from his account, @BW46, at 10:57 a.m.:

“I’m done with twitter. Try to be fan friendly and all I get is criticism. I wasn’t blessed with 5 tools. I worked hard to get here.”

He meant it, too. His account has been deleted.

On one level it’s pretty sad that a professional athlete felt like he was being picked on by fans badly enough to warrant this.  But it’s way, way sadder than anyone on the planet was motivated enough to hate on someone like Bobby Wilson.

What on Earth has he ever done to anyone? He’s an otherwise unremarkable backup catcher who makes near-minimum money and isn’t blocking playing time from anyone else that I know of. Getting angry at him is like getting angry at bread. Or a mostly reliable late model used car. What possible reason would anyone have for actually hating on him?

Oh well. The Internet.

Aaron Hicks would like to avoid Tommy John surgery

Aaron Hicks
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Yankees’ 2019 run ended in heartbreak on Saturday night when, despite a stunning ninth-inning comeback, they fell 6-4 to the Astros and officially lost their bid for the AL pennant. Now, facing a long offseason, there are a few decisions to be made.

One of those falls on the shoulders of outfielder Aaron Hicks, who told reporters that he “thinks he can continue playing without Tommy John surgery.” It’s unclear whose recommendation he’s basing that decision on, however, as MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch points out that Tommy John surgery was recommended during the slugger’s most recent meeting with Dr. Neal ELAttrache.

Hicks originally sustained a season-ending right flexor strain in early August and held several consultations with ElAttrache and the Yankees’ physician in the months that followed. He spent two and a half months on the 60-day injured list and finally returned to the Yankees’ roster during the ALCS, in which he went 2-for-13 with a base hit and a Game 5 three-run homer against the Astros.

Of course, a handful of strong performances doesn’t definitively prove that the outfielder is fully healed — or that he’ll be able to avoid aggravating the injury with further activity. Granted, Tommy John surgery isn’t a minor procedure; it’s one that requires up to a year of rest and rehabilitation before most players are cleared to throw again. Should Hicks wait to reverse his decision until he reports for spring training in 2020, though, it could push his return date out by another six months or so.