Twins sticking with Tsuyoshi Nishioka … for now

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Tsuyoshi Nishioka just completed the worst three-game series I’ve ever seen from a major leaguer, going 0-for-12 at the plate, committing three errors in the field, and making several other obvious defensive miscues that weren’t officially ruled errors.

He also played horribly at Triple-A prior to being called up and was plenty awful in Minnesota last season, leading fans and media members to wonder if the Twins could stick with him for even one more game.

They can and they will, according to general manager Terry Ryan:

He had a very difficult game yesterday and we all saw it but the only way to find out how he’ll respond up here is to play him. It didn’t to go so well so now we’ll have a decision to make once [Trevor] Plouffe is healthy and ready to come off. So we’ll see how Plouffe responds in the next few days and go from there.

In other words, Nishioka is going to stick around until Trevor Plouffe comes off the disabled list and then the Twins will send him back to Triple-A. Or maybe just outright release him and eat the $3 million he’s owed next season.

The Angels are giving managerial candidates a two-hour written test

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Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that the Los Angeles Angels are administering a two-hour written test to managerial candidates. The test presents “questions spanning analytical, interpersonal and game-management aspects of the job,” according to Morosi.

I can’t find any reference to it, but I remember another team doing some form of written testing for managerial candidates within the past couple of years. Questions which presented tactical dilemmas, for example. I don’t recall it being so intense, however. And then, as now, I have a hard time seeing experienced candidates wanting to sit for a two-hour written exam when their track record as a manager, along with an interview to assess compatibility should cover most of it. Just seems like an extension of the current trend in which front offices are taking away authority and, with this, some measure of professional respect, from managers.