Dustin Pedroia, Ichiro Suzuki, Rafael Furcal among worst hitters since May 15

26 Comments

I wrote yesterday about how Albert Pujols has recovered from his awful start to lead the entire American League in homers, RBIs, slugging percentage, and OPS since May 15.

Based off that I thought it would also be interesting to look at the least productive hitters during that same span, which accounts for about 70 games.

Braves second baseman Dan Uggla has baseball’s lowest batting average since May 15 at .161, but because he’s hit seven homers and drawn a ton of walks his .647 OPS is only the 26th-worst mark during that period.

Here are the “trailers” in OPS among hitters with at least 200 plate appearances since May 15:

Tony Gwynn Jr.    .549
Clint Barmes      .550
Rafael Furcal     .561
Justin Smoak      .566
Jordan Schafer    .589
Cameron Maybin    .596
Ichiro Suzuki     .596
Dustin Pedroia    .597

Tony Gwynn Jr., Clint Barmes, and Jordan Schafer aren’t surprises, as they’ve never really hit. Justin Smoak has been such a big disappointment that the Mariners demoted him to Triple-A last month.

More noteworthy is the inclusion of former MVPs Dustin Pedroia and Ichiro Suzuki, although Pedroia hasn’t been at full strength health-wise for seemingly the entire season and Suzuki has been unproductive since last year. And while not a former MVP, Rafael Furcal started the All-Star game for the NL less than a month ago.

The standard “small sample size” and “arbitrary endpoints” caveats apply, of course.

Brewers release Brett Lawrie

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Brett Lawrie has not played in the majors since 2016. Last February, however, he signed a minor league contract with the Brewers in an effort to make a comeback. It seems that comeback has come to an end. At least with Milwaukee, which has released him.

No word on exactly why he was released. It’s likely health-related as he had not appeared in any minor league games. His history of leg problems may very well have been the culprit.

Lawrie played six big league seasons, four of which came in Toronto and one each with the White Sox and the Athletics. In that time he hit .261/.315/.419 with 71 homers in 588 games. While he had his moments he never did live up to the hype generated by his partial 2011 season in which he posted a .953 OPS (153 OPS+) in 43 games.

If his career is to continue, it’ll be with another organization.