Dustin Pedroia, Ichiro Suzuki, Rafael Furcal among worst hitters since May 15

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I wrote yesterday about how Albert Pujols has recovered from his awful start to lead the entire American League in homers, RBIs, slugging percentage, and OPS since May 15.

Based off that I thought it would also be interesting to look at the least productive hitters during that same span, which accounts for about 70 games.

Braves second baseman Dan Uggla has baseball’s lowest batting average since May 15 at .161, but because he’s hit seven homers and drawn a ton of walks his .647 OPS is only the 26th-worst mark during that period.

Here are the “trailers” in OPS among hitters with at least 200 plate appearances since May 15:

Tony Gwynn Jr.    .549
Clint Barmes      .550
Rafael Furcal     .561
Justin Smoak      .566
Jordan Schafer    .589
Cameron Maybin    .596
Ichiro Suzuki     .596
Dustin Pedroia    .597

Tony Gwynn Jr., Clint Barmes, and Jordan Schafer aren’t surprises, as they’ve never really hit. Justin Smoak has been such a big disappointment that the Mariners demoted him to Triple-A last month.

More noteworthy is the inclusion of former MVPs Dustin Pedroia and Ichiro Suzuki, although Pedroia hasn’t been at full strength health-wise for seemingly the entire season and Suzuki has been unproductive since last year. And while not a former MVP, Rafael Furcal started the All-Star game for the NL less than a month ago.

The standard “small sample size” and “arbitrary endpoints” caveats apply, of course.

Blue Jays call up Cavan Biggio

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Cavan Biggio, son of Hall of Famer Craig Biggio, has been called up by the Toronto Blue Jays.

Biggio, 24, was a fifth round selection in the 2016 draft. So far this year he has put up a .307/.445/.504 batting line with six home runs and five steals Triple-A Buffalo. He’s a utility guy of sorts, having spent time at first, second, third and all three outfield positions so far this year. He, perhaps ironically, has not caught yet in his pro career, nor does he play short. Still, that kind of flexibility in a young player can be pretty useful in this age of big bullpens. Especially if he continues to rake like he has. He’ll likely mostly play second base for the Jays starting out.

With Vlad Guerrero Jr. playing third base every day, Toronto now has two sons of Hall of Famers on their roster. That’s pretty neat.