Kendrys Morales becomes third player ever to homer from both sides of the plate in same inning

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Kendrys Morales accomplished a very rare feat during the sixth inning tonight against the Rangers, homering from both sides of the plate while driving in six runs.

The Angels scored nine runs in the inning. Morales sparked the rally with a two-run homer off starter Roy Oswalt and later added a grand slam off left-hander Robbie Ross. He’s just the third player in MLB history to homer from both sides of the plate in the same inning, joining Carlos Baerga (1993) and Mark Bellhorn (2002).

Morales is the second player in Angels’ history to collect two home runs in the same inning, joining Rick Reichardt (April 30, 1966). The six RBI are a new club record and the most in one inning in MLB since Juan Uribe had six on September 10, 2010 as a member of the Giants.

Oddly enough, Morales entered tonight’s action with just two home runs over his previous 26 games. The grand slam was the second of his career and his first since he infamously shattered his lower left leg jumping onto home plate on May 29, 2010. Quite a way to bust out of that power slump.

Oswalt ended up being charged with eight runs on 11 hits (including three home runs) over 5 1/3 innings. He now has an ugly 6.49 ERA in six starts with the Rangers, allowing 54 hits and seven home runs over just 34 2/3 innings.

Astros trade Jake Marisnick to the Mets

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The Mets and Astros have announced that they’ve completed a trade. The Mets will get outfielder Jake Marisnick from the Astros in exchange for outfielder Kenedy Corona and lefty Blake Taylor.

Marisnick, a seven-year big league veteran, has never hit all that much — his career line is .227/.280/.380 — but he’s a very strong defender at all three outfield positions and can run a good bit. That makes him a decent bench option at least. To the extent the Mets rely on him to be more than a bench guy they’ll get diminishing returns, but the Astros used him a good deal more than your standard 4-5th outfielder and that worked out fine. Really, having a no-hit, plus-defending center fielder is something that even contenders can deal with, even if you’d like some more offense.

Taylor is organizational depth. He turns 25 next season and has only pitched 50 innings above A-ball. Corona was an international signee last year so he’s not near contributing to a contender like Houston.