Mets, Cubs talked Geovany Soto

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It’s no secret that the Mets have been looking for a right-handed complement to Josh Thole behind the plate. That search led to talks with the Cubs regarding Geovany Soto this past week.

Andy Martino broke the news today, but he said a deal was unlikely. Following up on it, the Chicago Tribune’s Phil Rogers said talks were dead. The Cubs are open to moving Soto and going with Steve Clevenger and Welington Castillo as a catching tandem, but Soto’s salary was probably more than the Mets were interested in taking on, particularly since they’re now looking more towards 2013.

The Mets have also engaged in talks for Colorado’s Ramon Hernandez and Boston’s Kelly Shoppach in the past without coming away with either. Those players could both come at discounts after Tuesday’s trade deadline, assuming they clear waivers.

Soto, 29, has hit just .195/.278/.345 this season, and given that he’s making $4.3 million, he’s looking like a top non-tender candidate this winter. The Mets could again look at him then. Unless he comes through with a big finish here, he’s probably looking at a salary closer to $2 million in 2013, making him more palatable as a backup.

Aaron Hicks would like to avoid Tommy John surgery

Aaron Hicks
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The Yankees’ 2019 run ended in heartbreak on Saturday night when, despite a stunning ninth-inning comeback, they fell 6-4 to the Astros and officially lost their bid for the AL pennant. Now, facing a long offseason, there are a few decisions to be made.

One of those falls on the shoulders of outfielder Aaron Hicks, who told reporters that he “thinks he can continue playing without Tommy John surgery.” It’s unclear whose recommendation he’s basing that decision on, however, as MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch points out that Tommy John surgery was recommended during the slugger’s most recent meeting with Dr. Neal ELAttrache.

Hicks originally sustained a season-ending right flexor strain in early August and held several consultations with ElAttrache and the Yankees’ physician in the months that followed. He spent two and a half months on the 60-day injured list and finally returned to the Yankees’ roster during the ALCS, in which he went 2-for-13 with a base hit and a Game 5 three-run homer against the Astros.

Of course, a handful of strong performances doesn’t definitively prove that the outfielder is fully healed — or that he’ll be able to avoid aggravating the injury with further activity. Granted, Tommy John surgery isn’t a minor procedure; it’s one that requires up to a year of rest and rehabilitation before most players are cleared to throw again. Should Hicks wait to reverse his decision until he reports for spring training in 2020, though, it could push his return date out by another six months or so.