The Rangers are preparing to move Alexi Ogando back into the rotation

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We heard earlier this week that the Rangers were considering moving Alexi Ogando back in the starting rotation. Well, they got the ball rolling in last night’s loss to the White Sox.

Last night’s starter, Yu Darvish, was knocked out of the ballgame after 6 1/3 innings, so Ogando ended up pitching the final 2 2/3 innings. The 28-year-old right-hander allowed two hits and two walks, including an RBI double to Alex Rios and a two-run homer to Alexei Ramirez in the top of the ninth. He ended up throwing a season-high 44 pitches, topping the 39 he threw over three innings in his spot-start against the Giants back on June 10.

According to Jeff Wilson of the Fort Worth-Star Telegram, Rangers manager Ron Washington confirmed after the game that they are trying to stretch Ogando as a starting pitcher. If it happens, he would take the rotation spot of Colby Lewis, who is out for the season following surgery yesterday to repair a torn flexor tendon in his right elbow. The spot is currently being held down by Scott Feldman, who tossed seven innings of one-run ball against the Red Sox on Monday.

Ogando might not be needed in the rotation at all if the Rangers get someone Josh Johnson from the Marlins or James Shields from the Rays before Tuesday’s non-waiver trade deadline, but he’s a pretty nice “Plan B.”

Marlins unveil what they’re putting in the space where the home run sculpture used to be

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. In October they announced that it would, in fact, be moving out to a plaza or the parking lot or someplace you’re unlikely to ever see it because who goes to Marlins games?

Today we got a tease of what the Marlins are doing with the space the sculpture is vacating:

It was only a matter of time before that green wall went away. There are a lot of things I like about the overall aesthetic of Marlins Park, but almost all of them are because of their novelty. Jeff Loria was bad for a lot of reasons, but one of the few good things he did was eschew nostalgia and traditionalism with the ballpark. Nostalgia and traditionalism, unfortunately, is the straw that stirs baseball’s drink, so any “weird” colors or flourishes were gonna be beat out of that place as the years went on. It was inevitable.

As for the “three-tier social space,” here’s hoping that tickets for it are cheap or the Marlins start winning ballgames soon, because the Marlins can’t really fill their existing spectator spaces now.