Cole Hamels wants to pitch with Cliff Lee, Cliff Lee could be traded

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Or: Great Moments in mildly b.s. justifications for accepting a giant contract. First, Jerry Crasnick:

Then, Jon Paul Morosi:

Four general managers of other clubs told FOXSports.com Wednesday that Lee is not yet formally available, but other executives expect Phillies GM Ruben Amaro Jr. will consider offers for the left-hander leading up to next Tuesday’s non-waiver deadline.

Rival team officials believe Amaro has little choice but to at least explore the market for Lee, who has three years and $87.5 million left on his contract after this season.

Cole Hamels is no idiot. He knows, like every other player knows, that one cannot choose one’s teammates and that someone who is here today may very well be — actually, almost certainly will be — gone tomorrow.  If Hamels actually told his agent “hey, I wanna sign because Cliff Lee is there,” his agent would have smacked him over the head and told him to grow up.

There are only two relevant reasons why Cliff Lee signed with Philly: the money was where it needed to be and he likes the organization. Maybe throw in the city itself. Point is, it’s not the teammates or, more to the point, their future tenure with the team.  Saying so is a nice bit of morale boosting in the clubhouse, it may be a nice thing to say about friends on the team and it certainly gives the media an answer to the “why did you sign” question that isn’t “$144 million, dudes!”

But there’s no way that kind of thing can reasonably be a determining factor unless you assume — which you should not assume — that Cole Hamels just fell off the turnip truck and doesn’t know that anyone can be dealt at any time.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.