Angels to keep struggling Ervin Santana on “out count”

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Ervin Santana’s brutal season continued Saturday, as he failed to make it out of the second inning against the Rangers while serving up three homers and allowing six runs.

Santana is now 4-10 with a 6.00 ERA and 23 homers allowed in 111 innings and the Angels are 5-14 when he starts compared to 47-30 when anyone else takes the mound.

And yet instead of simply dumping Santana from the rotation manager Mike Scioscia will continue to start him every fifth day while putting him on an “out count.” Rather than limiting his pitches Scioscia has decided to keep Santana in the game for 15 outs–in other words, five innings–at which point he’ll be removed for a reliever.

Alden Gonzalez of MLB.com writes that the idea is to keep Santana from having to go through a lineup for a fourth time while giving him more leeway to be aggressive. He also notes that Scioscia employed a similar strategy with a struggling Scott Kazmir and … well, he’s now pitching in an independent league at age 28, so suffice it to say the “out count” didn’t work any magic on Kazmir.

It’s also worth noting that Santana has averaged 17.5 outs per start this season and failed to record even six outs in two of his last three starts. Having to go through the lineup for a third and fourth time hasn’t really been the issue.

White Sox trying to trade Avasail Garcia

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A wise man once said that a wise mad said that you miss 100% of the shots you don’t take. The White Sox are not prepared to miss their shot: Mark Feinsand of MLB.com says they are “actively trying” to trade Avisail Garcia.

Which seems like a super difficult shot given that (a) Garcia had knee and hamstring injuries this past season; (b) hit just .236/.281/.438 when he did play; and (c) is arbitration eligible and stands to make more than the $6.7 million salary he made in 2018. You put those things together and you have a guy that the Sox are almost 100% going to non-tender rather than take to arbitration, thereby making him freely and cheaply available to anyone who wants him as long as they can wait until November 30, which is the tender/non-tender deadline.

Garcia, who somehow is still just 27 years-old, is one year removed from what many considered a breakout year, in which he hit .330/.380/.506 in 136 games, but I don’t think anyone is going to bite at him in a trade. Assuming he’s in decent shape and recovered from injuries, however, he could be a useful player in 2019.