Stephen Strasburg on Nationals’ innings limit: “They’re going to have to rip the ball out of my hands”

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General manager Mike Rizzo said before the season that the Nationals would limit Stephen Strasburg to 160 innings as he comes back from Tommy John elbow surgery, but no one, including Strasburg, seems to think that will actually happen.

Strasburg has already thrown 99 innings, putting him on pace for around 193, and when asked about the potential 160-inning limit by MLB Network Radio he replied: “They’re going to have to rip the ball out of my hands.”

Strasburg went on to say: “I have no clue how many innings I’m going to throw this year. I’ve answered that question multiple times, and nobody’s said anything to me. I feel great right now.”

He’s averaged 5.82 innings per start, so to go from a 193-inning pace to a 160-inning pace he’d have to skip 5-6 of his remaining 15-16 starts. Shorter starts are also an option, although Strasburg has been allowed to top 100 pitches in a game just six times as is and the Nationals will presumably want to keep him fully stretched out for potential postseason games.

And those playoff starts would make it even tougher to keep Strasburg at or around 160 innings for the season, assuming the Nationals include those in the count. If they don’t skip any of his regular season starts and he ends up pitching in the playoffs, Strasburg could easily approach 210-220 innings.

Angels fire back at Rob Manfred’s comments re: Mike Trout

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren
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Angels outfielder Mike Trout‘s marketability has been a topic of conversation in recent days as the best players in baseball converged upon Washington, D.C. for the All-Star Game. We learned that, according to one firm that measures consumer appeal of personalities, Trout is as recognizable to the average American as Brooklyn Nets reserve forward Kenneth Faried, despite being far and away the best player in baseball and one of the greatest players ever to play the game.

Commissioner Rob Manfred also addressed Trout’s marketability, Gabe Lacques of USA TODAY Sports reported. Manfred said, “Mike has made decisions on what he wants to do, doesn’t want to do, how he wants to spend his free time or not spend his free time. I think we could help him make his brand very bug. But he has to make a decision to engage. It takes time and effort.”

The Angels fired back on Wednesday, releasing a statement that said:

On behalf of the Angels Organization and baseball fans everywhere, congratulations to Mike Trout on another outstanding All-Star Game performance.

Mike Trout is an exceptional ambassador for the game. Combined with his talent, his solid character creates a perfect role model for young people everywhere. Each year, Mike devotes a tremendous amount of his time and effort contributing to our Organization, and marketing Major League Baseball. He continually chooses to participate in the community, visiting hospitals, schools, and countless other charities. One of Mike’s traits that people admire most is his humility. His brand is built upon generously spending his time engaging with fans, both at home and on the road, while remaining a remarkable baseball player and teammate.

In addition, Mike spends quality time as a husband, son, brother, uncle, and friend. We applaud him for prioritizing his personal values over commercial self-promotion. That is rare in today’s society and stands out as much as his extraordinary talent.

It’s not on Trout to build a brand that appeals to MLB’s marketing department, so the Angels are right to back Trout’s decision to stay out of the limelight. The Angels’ motivation likely isn’t entirely selfless, however, as supporting him in this situation may make it more enticing for him to sign a contract extension before his current contract expires after the 2020 season.