Dave Duncan unlikely to return after coaching All-Star game

5 Comments

Dave Duncan took an indefinite leave of absence as Cardinals pitching coach due to his wife’s health problems, but served on Tony La Russa’s staff for the All-Star game Tuesday night.

However, much like La Russa ruling out a comeback following the game Duncan replied “I don’t think so” when asked if he has plans to resume coaching.

He did leave the door open at least a crack, telling Rick Hummel of the St. Louis Post Dispatch:

Maybe somewhere along the line, I’ll talk to people to see what might be available there because I don’t know that I want to be full-time. There’s a lot less pressure doing what I’m doing. I’m busy enough that I don’t [miss coaching]. There’s a lot of responsibility with [his wife]. You’ve got to stay on top of so many different things, like the treatments.

Duncan is technically still under contract with the Cardinals through 2013 and they’re still paying him, so taking a front office job or advisor role or roving instructor gig might be a fit at some point.

Baseball seeking a second lab for MLB COVID-19 tests

MLB COVID-19 tests
Getty Images
1 Comment

Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reported last night that Major League Baseball is “actively pursuing an additional medical lab site to increase the speed and efficiency” of MLB COVID-19 tests.

The current setup — as planned by MLB and approved by the MLBPA as a part of the plan to play the 2020 season — is for all MLB COVID-19 tests to be sent to and processed by MLB’s PED testing lab in Salt Lake City, Utah. As you likely heard, there have been delays in the administration of COVID-19 tests and in the shipping of tests to Utah, but to date no one has reported that the lab itself has not been able to handle the tests once they’ve arrived there. If MLB is looking for a second lab site a week into this process, it suggests that their plans for the Utah lab might not be working the way they had anticipated.

The issues with testing have created unease around the game in recent days, with some players and team executives speaking out against Major League Baseball’s handling of the plan in the early going. Commissioner Rob Manfred, meanwhile, has responded defensively to the criticism.

Meanwhile, the New York Times reported this morning that, months into the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States still lacks testing capacity. From the report:

Lines for coronavirus tests have stretched around city blocks and tests ran out altogether in at least one site on Monday, new evidence that the country is still struggling to create a sufficient testing system months into its battle with Covid-19 . . .“It’s terrifying, and clearly an evidence of a failure of the system,” said Dr. Morgan Katz, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins Hospital . . . in recent weeks, as cases have surged in many states, the demand for testing has soared, surpassing capacity and creating a new testing crisis.

It’s less than obvious, to say the least, how Major League Baseball plans to expand capacity for MLB COVID-19 tests while America as a whole is experiencing “a new testing crisis” and a “failure of the system.” At the very least it’s less than obvious how, even if Major League Baseball can do so, it can do so ethically.