Won’t somebody think of the poor superstars being booed?

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I thought Robinson Cano getting mercilessly booed and jeered by the Kansas City fans at last night’s Home Run Derby was a bit … childish. I mean, really, we get it. You wanted Billy Butler in the Derby. I kind of did too, if for no other reason than it would allow me to say “Country Breakfast” more often than I already do.

It did seem, though, that the degree to which they booed Cano was a bit much and that it ended up reflecting more poorly on the crowd than anything. Made the fans seem too insecure and provincial and that’s never a good look.

But hey, they paid their money and they can do what they want.  It’s not like anyone should feel the need to do anything about it, right?  Right?!

 

 

As I clutch my pearls, try to fight off the vapors and look for my fainting couch, I too am desperate to find a way to keep a big baseball star from being booed. Because that is clearly the end of the world and must be stopped.

Unless this were to happen in New York, in which case the fans would be given a free pass by the likes of Harper and the player being booed would be told, hey, you just gotta learn to handle the pressure of New York, pal.

Diamondbacks, T.J. McFarland avoid arbitration

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Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports reports that the Diamondbacks and reliever T.J. McFarland have avoided arbitration, agreeing on a $1.45 million salary for the 2019 season. McFarland, in his third of four years of arbitration eligibility, filed for $1.675 million while the Diamondbacks countered at $1.275 million. McFarland ended up settling for just under the midpoint of those two figures.

McFarland, 29, was terrific out of the bullpen for the D-Backs last season, finishing with a 2.00 ERA and a 42/22 K/BB ratio in 72 innings. While the lefty may not miss a lot of bats, he does induce quite a few grounders. His 67.9 percent ground ball rate last season was the third highest among relievers with at least 50 innings, trailing only Brad Ziegler (71.1%) and Scott Alexander (70.6%).

McFarland was dominant against left-handed hitters, limiting them to a .388 OPS last season, but the D-Backs deployed him nearly twice as often against right-handed hitters, who posted an aggregate .764 OPS against him. It will be interesting to see if the club decides to use him more as a platoon reliever in 2019.