The worst of the worst at the All-Star break

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Because the non-All-Stars deserve recognition too — even when they’d prefer to hide their faces — here’s a look at some midpoint leaderboards in reverse order.

OPS
1. Dee Gordon (SS LAD): .562
2. Cliff Pennington (SS Oak): .563
3. Cameron Maybin (CF SD): .596
4. Jamey Carroll (INF Min): .597
5. Justin Smoak (1B Sea): .597
6. Robert Andino (2B Bal): .611
7. Jemile Weeks (2B Oak): .620
8. Brandon Crawford (SS SF): .621
9. Alexei Ramirez (SS CWS): .628
10. Jordan Schafer (CF Hou): .634

Fangraphs WAR – position players
1. Ryan Raburn (2B Det): -1.4
2. Chone Figgins (UT Sea): -1.3
3. Brennan Boesch (RF Det): -1.3
4. Endy Chavez (LF Bal): -1.2
5. Chris Coghlan (CF Mia): -1.2
6. Tyler Pastornicky (SS Atl): -1.1
7. Brian Roberts (2B Bal): -1.0
8. Emmanuel Burriss (INF SF): -1.0
9. Marlon Byrd (CF ChC/Bos): -1.0
10. Jeff Francoeur (RF KC): -0.9

Baseball-reference WAR – position players
1. Francoeur: -1.9
2. Pastornicky: -1.6
3. Michael Young (DH Tex): -1.6
4. Raburn: -1.5
5. Coghlan: -1.5
6. Boesch: -1.4
7. Rickie Weeks (2B Mil): -1.4
8. Dee Gordon: -1.3
9. Endy Chavez: -1.1
10. Gaby Sanchez (1B Mia): -1.1

Outs made
1. J.J. Hardy (SS Bal): 287
2. Ichiro Suzuki (RF Sea): 275
2. Ian Kinsler (2B Tex): 275
4. Jimmy Rollins (SS Phi): 269
5. Derek Jeter (SS NYY): 264
6. Starlin Castro (SS ChC): 262
6. Jose Reyes (SS Mia): 262
8. Yunel Escobar (SS Tor): 261
9. M. Young: 260
9. Ian Desmond (SS Was): 260

Stolen-base percentage (min. 5 attempts)
1. Miguel Olivo (C Sea): 20% (1-for-5)
1. Francoeur: 20% (1-for-5)
3. David DeJesus (OF ChC): 29% (2-for-7)
4. Matt Kemp (CF LAD): 40% (2-for-5)
4. Jason Bourgeois (OF KC): 40% (2-for-5)
4. Evan Longoria (3B TB): 40% (2-for-5)
4. Asdrubal Cabrera (SS Cle): 40% (2-for-5)
8. Willie Bloomquist (INF Ari): 43% (6-for-14)
8. Justin Ruggiano (OF Mia): 43% (3-for-7)
8. Collin Cowgill (OF Oak): 43% (3-for-7)

ERA (qualified for ERA title)
1. Tim Lincecum (SF): 6.42
2. Jake Arrieta (Bal): 6.13
3. Mike Minor (Atl): 5.97
4. Randy Wolf (Mil): 5.80
5. Hector Noesi (Sea): 5.77
6. Ervin Santana (LAA): 5.75
7. Clay Buchholz (Bos): 5.53
8. Ricky Romero (Tor): 5.22
9. Bruce Chen (KC): 5.22
10. J.A. Happ (Hou): 5.14

ERA (min. 20 IP)
1. Manny Acosta (NYM): 11.86
2. Josh Outman (Col): 9.00
3. Guillermo Moscoso (Col): 8.23
4. Nick Blackburn (Min): 8.10
5. Chris Volstad (ChC): 7.94
6. Chien-Ming Wang (Was): 7.61
7. Daniel Hudson (Ari): 7.35
8. Jhoulys Chacin (Col): 7.30
9. Jesse Chavez (Tor): 7.08
10. Liam Hendriks (Min): 7.04

fWAR
1. Bobby Cassevah (LAA): -0.7
2. Acosta: -0.7
3. Josh Lindblom (LAD): -0.7
4. Blackburn: -0.6
5. Mark Rzepczynski (StL): -0.6
6. Brad Brach (SD): -0.5
7. Rafael Dolis (ChC): -0.5
8. Noesi: -0.5
9. Collin Balester (Det): -0.5
10. Francisco Cordero (Tor): -0.5

rWAR
1. Lincecum: -2.0
2. Acosta: -1.9
3. Blackburn: -1.8
4. Minor: -1.7
5. Volstad: -15
6. Heath Bell (Mia): -1.3
7. E. Santana: -1.3
8. Jason Marquis (Min/SD): -1.2
9. Hendriks: -1.2
10. Noesi: -1.2

Quality start percentage (qualified for ERA title)
1. Lincecum: 22.2%
2. Wolf: 29.4%
2. Erik Bedard (Pit): 29.4%
4. Minor: 31.3%
5. Randall Delgado (Atl): 31.3%
6. Arrieta: 33.3%
7. Lucas Harrell (Hou): 35.3%
8. Buchholz: 35.7%
9. Matt Moore (TB): 41.2%
9. Noesi: 41.2%
9. Dan Haren (LAA): 41.2%
9. E. Santana: 41.2%
9. Luke Hochevar (KC): 41.2%

Blown saves (closers)
1. Brandon League (Sea): 6 in 15 chances
1. H. Bell: 6 in 25 chances
3. John Axford (Mil): 5 in 20 chances
4. Aroldis Chapman (Cin): 4 in 15 chances
4. Rafael Betancourt (Col): 4 in 19 chances
4. Alfredo Aceves: 4 in 23 chances
4. Jason Motte (StL): 4 in 24 chances
4. Santiago Casilla (SF): 4 in 25 chances

Blown saves (setup men)
1. Chad Qualls (Phi/NYY): 5
1. Rzepczynski (StL): 5
3. Pedro Strop (Bal): 4
3. David Hernandez (Ari): 4
3. Andrew Cashner (SD): 4
3. Rex Brothers (Col): 4
3. Francisco Rodriguez (Mil): 4

Noah Syndergaard on Mets extending Jacob deGrom: ‘Pay the man already.’

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March has marked contract extension season across Major League Baseball. Just in the last week, we have seen Justin Verlander, Chris Sale, Brandon Lowe, Alex Bregman, Ryan Pressly, Mike Trout, Eloy Jiménez, Blake Snell, and Paul Goldschmidt sign extensions. Nolan Arenado, Luis Severino, and Aaron Nola also notably signed extensions during the offseason.

One name strikingly absent from that list: Mets ace Jacob deGrom. The reigning NL Cy Young Award winner is coming off of a season in which he posted a 1.70 ERA with 269 strikeouts and 46 walks across 217 innings. It’s the lowest ERA by a qualified starter since Zack Greinke‘s 1.66 in 2015. Prior to Greinke, no pitcher had posted an ERA of 1.70 or lower since Greg Maddux in 1994-95 (1.56, 1.63).

deGrom is earning $17 million this season and will enter his fourth and final year of arbitration eligibility going into the 2020 season. He will turn 31 years old in June, but is an obvious extension candidate for the Mets, who have built arguably their most competitive team since 2015, when the club lost the World Series in five games to the Royals. Thus far, though, the Mets and deGrom haven’t been able to get anywhere in extension talks.

deGrom’s rotation mate Noah Syndergaard is watching. Per MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo, Syndergaard said, “I think Jake’s the best pitcher in baseball right now. I think he deserves whatever amount he’s worth. I want them to keep him happy so when it does come time for him to reach free agency, he stays on our side pitching for the Mets. I just think they should quit all the fuss and pay the man already.”

Syndergaard added that the recent extension trend around baseball — and deGrom’s lack of an extension to date — sends a message. He said, “I think so, yes, because of what you see in what’s going on in baseball right now. If there wasn’t a trend of other guys getting contract extensions, then I don’t know what the circumstance would be. But you see Chris Sale, Verlander getting extensions. I think it’s time Jacob gets one too.”

Part of the equation behind the recent rash of extensions is the stagnation of free agency. Craig Kimbrel and Dallas Keuchel — two of baseball’s better pitchers — have gone through almost an entire spring training without being signed. Bryce Harper and Manny Machado didn’t find new homes until late February. Free agents in their 30’s are largely being underpaid or otherwise forgotten about. Extensions represent financial security for young and old players alike. Syndergaard himself can become a free agent after the 2021 season, so if deGrom’s prospects improve, then so too will his, at least without knowing the details of the next collective bargaining agreement which will be put into place ahead of the 2022 season.