The worst of the worst at the All-Star break

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Because the non-All-Stars deserve recognition too — even when they’d prefer to hide their faces — here’s a look at some midpoint leaderboards in reverse order.

OPS
1. Dee Gordon (SS LAD): .562
2. Cliff Pennington (SS Oak): .563
3. Cameron Maybin (CF SD): .596
4. Jamey Carroll (INF Min): .597
5. Justin Smoak (1B Sea): .597
6. Robert Andino (2B Bal): .611
7. Jemile Weeks (2B Oak): .620
8. Brandon Crawford (SS SF): .621
9. Alexei Ramirez (SS CWS): .628
10. Jordan Schafer (CF Hou): .634

Fangraphs WAR – position players
1. Ryan Raburn (2B Det): -1.4
2. Chone Figgins (UT Sea): -1.3
3. Brennan Boesch (RF Det): -1.3
4. Endy Chavez (LF Bal): -1.2
5. Chris Coghlan (CF Mia): -1.2
6. Tyler Pastornicky (SS Atl): -1.1
7. Brian Roberts (2B Bal): -1.0
8. Emmanuel Burriss (INF SF): -1.0
9. Marlon Byrd (CF ChC/Bos): -1.0
10. Jeff Francoeur (RF KC): -0.9

Baseball-reference WAR – position players
1. Francoeur: -1.9
2. Pastornicky: -1.6
3. Michael Young (DH Tex): -1.6
4. Raburn: -1.5
5. Coghlan: -1.5
6. Boesch: -1.4
7. Rickie Weeks (2B Mil): -1.4
8. Dee Gordon: -1.3
9. Endy Chavez: -1.1
10. Gaby Sanchez (1B Mia): -1.1

Outs made
1. J.J. Hardy (SS Bal): 287
2. Ichiro Suzuki (RF Sea): 275
2. Ian Kinsler (2B Tex): 275
4. Jimmy Rollins (SS Phi): 269
5. Derek Jeter (SS NYY): 264
6. Starlin Castro (SS ChC): 262
6. Jose Reyes (SS Mia): 262
8. Yunel Escobar (SS Tor): 261
9. M. Young: 260
9. Ian Desmond (SS Was): 260

Stolen-base percentage (min. 5 attempts)
1. Miguel Olivo (C Sea): 20% (1-for-5)
1. Francoeur: 20% (1-for-5)
3. David DeJesus (OF ChC): 29% (2-for-7)
4. Matt Kemp (CF LAD): 40% (2-for-5)
4. Jason Bourgeois (OF KC): 40% (2-for-5)
4. Evan Longoria (3B TB): 40% (2-for-5)
4. Asdrubal Cabrera (SS Cle): 40% (2-for-5)
8. Willie Bloomquist (INF Ari): 43% (6-for-14)
8. Justin Ruggiano (OF Mia): 43% (3-for-7)
8. Collin Cowgill (OF Oak): 43% (3-for-7)

ERA (qualified for ERA title)
1. Tim Lincecum (SF): 6.42
2. Jake Arrieta (Bal): 6.13
3. Mike Minor (Atl): 5.97
4. Randy Wolf (Mil): 5.80
5. Hector Noesi (Sea): 5.77
6. Ervin Santana (LAA): 5.75
7. Clay Buchholz (Bos): 5.53
8. Ricky Romero (Tor): 5.22
9. Bruce Chen (KC): 5.22
10. J.A. Happ (Hou): 5.14

ERA (min. 20 IP)
1. Manny Acosta (NYM): 11.86
2. Josh Outman (Col): 9.00
3. Guillermo Moscoso (Col): 8.23
4. Nick Blackburn (Min): 8.10
5. Chris Volstad (ChC): 7.94
6. Chien-Ming Wang (Was): 7.61
7. Daniel Hudson (Ari): 7.35
8. Jhoulys Chacin (Col): 7.30
9. Jesse Chavez (Tor): 7.08
10. Liam Hendriks (Min): 7.04

fWAR
1. Bobby Cassevah (LAA): -0.7
2. Acosta: -0.7
3. Josh Lindblom (LAD): -0.7
4. Blackburn: -0.6
5. Mark Rzepczynski (StL): -0.6
6. Brad Brach (SD): -0.5
7. Rafael Dolis (ChC): -0.5
8. Noesi: -0.5
9. Collin Balester (Det): -0.5
10. Francisco Cordero (Tor): -0.5

rWAR
1. Lincecum: -2.0
2. Acosta: -1.9
3. Blackburn: -1.8
4. Minor: -1.7
5. Volstad: -15
6. Heath Bell (Mia): -1.3
7. E. Santana: -1.3
8. Jason Marquis (Min/SD): -1.2
9. Hendriks: -1.2
10. Noesi: -1.2

Quality start percentage (qualified for ERA title)
1. Lincecum: 22.2%
2. Wolf: 29.4%
2. Erik Bedard (Pit): 29.4%
4. Minor: 31.3%
5. Randall Delgado (Atl): 31.3%
6. Arrieta: 33.3%
7. Lucas Harrell (Hou): 35.3%
8. Buchholz: 35.7%
9. Matt Moore (TB): 41.2%
9. Noesi: 41.2%
9. Dan Haren (LAA): 41.2%
9. E. Santana: 41.2%
9. Luke Hochevar (KC): 41.2%

Blown saves (closers)
1. Brandon League (Sea): 6 in 15 chances
1. H. Bell: 6 in 25 chances
3. John Axford (Mil): 5 in 20 chances
4. Aroldis Chapman (Cin): 4 in 15 chances
4. Rafael Betancourt (Col): 4 in 19 chances
4. Alfredo Aceves: 4 in 23 chances
4. Jason Motte (StL): 4 in 24 chances
4. Santiago Casilla (SF): 4 in 25 chances

Blown saves (setup men)
1. Chad Qualls (Phi/NYY): 5
1. Rzepczynski (StL): 5
3. Pedro Strop (Bal): 4
3. David Hernandez (Ari): 4
3. Andrew Cashner (SD): 4
3. Rex Brothers (Col): 4
3. Francisco Rodriguez (Mil): 4

Rumor: MLB execs discussing 100-game season that would begin July 1

David Price and Mookie Betts
Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
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Matt Spiegel of 670 The Score Chicago heard from a source that Major League Baseball executives have been discussing a 100-game season that would begin on July 1 and conclude on October 15. It would essentially pick up the second half schedule, eliminating the All-Star Game while hosting the World Series at a neutral warm-weather stadium — ideally Dodger Stadium.

In the event the Dodgers, who won 106 games last year, made it all the way through the playoffs, the World Series would be hosted in Anaheim or San Diego. The earlier rounds of the playoffs would be played in the cities of the teams involved, which might be tough since the postseason would extend into November.

Spiegel went on to describe this vision as “an absolute best case scenario,” and that’s accurate. In order for the regular season to begin on July 1, the players would need to have several weeks if not a full month prior to get back into playing shape — more or less an abbreviated second spring training. And that would mean the U.S. having made significant progress against the virus by way of herd immunity or a vaccine, which would allow for nonessential businesses to resume operations. The U.S., sadly, is faring not so well compared to other nations around the world for a variety of reasons, but all of which point to a return to normalcy by the summer seeming rather unlikely.

Regardless, the league does have to plan for the potential of being able to start the regular season this summer just in case things really do break right and offer that opportunity. Commissioner Rob Manfred has stated multiple times about the league’s need to be creative, referring to ideas like playing deep into the fall, changing up the location of games, playing without fans in attendance, etc. This rumor certainly fits the “creative” mold.