Jose Canseco thinks he’d win the Home Run Derby

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Well, of course he does. He’s Jose Canseco, after all.

Unfortunately, Canseco, who turned 48 a week ago, wasn’t invited to the festivities by either Matt Kemp or Robinson Cano. Surely only because he wasn’t eligible to be invited, by virtue of his being out of the league for 11 years now. Still, I’d be in favor of making him a late addition to the event. Put Billy Butler in there too to give the Kansas City fans something to root for.

Alas, Canseco probably has too much going on to arrive on such late notice.

But if he does show, please, let him give Chris Berman’s job a try.

Matt Carpenter hit a standup bunt double

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The wave of defensive shifts we’ve seen over the past few years has led to a lot of armchair hitting coaches demanding that players bunt to beat it. This is easier said than done, however.

The shift happens because certain hitters tend to pull the ball. Certain hitters tend to pull the ball because pulling the ball is what happens when one gets a strong, quick swing on a pitch one identifies early and which one endeavors to send as far away from home plate as possible. Which is to say that pulling is a skill that is good to have and which is strongly selected for among hitters.

In light of that, “why not just bunt to beat the shift” takes are kind of lazy. Bunting is hard! And it is not a thing guys who get shifted a lot are good at. Most of the time asking a player to do a thing he is not well-equipped to do is a bad idea. Indeed, a hitter voluntarily going away from his strength is something the defense would much prefer.

Most of the time anyway.

Last night Matt Carpenter made those armchair hitting coaches happy by laying down a bunt to beat the shift. And he laid it down so well that he ended up with a standup double:

One batter later Carpenter scored on a Starlin Castro error.

The shift giveth and the shift taketh away.