Dispatches from Kansas City: “Have you seen George Brett around?”

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HardballTalk’s Drew Silva is filing regular stories from this year’s MLB All-Star festivities in Kansas City. Part OnePart TwoPart Three. Part Four.

The Royals haven’t won a division title since 1985 and have finished with a winning record just three times since since 1992, which has translated into over 20 years of bad attendance totals at Kauffman Stadium. But the apathy here feels temporary.

Last night’s Futures Game was a sellout — the first in the 15-year history of the event — and Kauffman remained packed for the Legends & Celebrity Softball Game that was played right after. Kansas head basketball coach Bill Self drew decibel-pushing reactions (boos from Mizzou fans and cheers from the Rock Chalk faithful) every time he stepped to the plate or was spotted on the massive HD video board that sits below the giant gold crown in center field. Chiefs quarterback Matt Cassel also caused a stir.

The MLB All-Star Charity 5K & Fun Run had more than 8,000 participants on Sunday morning, smashing the previous record. The public water spouts downtown in this City of Fountains have been dyed royal blue.

There’s an excitement here for the All-Star Game and the publicity it might bring. Go anywhere in town and mention you’re covering the events and you’ll get a big grin and tips on where to eat and drink. Maybe that’s just good ole fashioned Midwest generosity. Or maybe it’s time for Royals owner David Glass — former president and CEO of Wal-Mart — to recognize that he’s sitting on another potential gold mine.

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I headed up the interstate this morning at around 11:45 a.m. for All-Star media day — held inside the climate-controlled club suite level at Arrowhead Stadium. The first player I encountered was Marlins outfielder and noted tweeter Logan Morrison, who was being trailed by two cameramen and a sound guy as he peaked around different corners of the room. I believe they were filming scenes for the second season of Showtime’s “The Franchise.”

LoMo grabbed a Gatorade from a cooler next to where I was checking my phone and asked if I’d “seen George Brett around.” I couldn’t help but laugh. “Are you looking for him?” I uttered back, in a total stupor. My brain was too blown to process his response. It’s not every day that a current major league star asks you if you’ve spotted a Hall of Famer. My guess is that exchange won’t make it into an episode.

I grabbed an open chair by the back of the All-Star Game press conference, which was already underway, and listened in as National League skipper Tony La Russa finished up fielding questions about his decision to start San Francisco’s Matt Cain over the Mets’ R.A. Dickey. “I’m very aware of the first half (Dickey has) had,” La Russa insisted. “The one edge that I thought would make sense is that we have Buster Posey catching and Matt was equally deserving. … We wanted to reward Cain for a great career of excellence. It’s a tough call.”

Cain is 27. Dickey is 37. And Tony is still Tony.

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Next the American League and National League All-Stars were made available for interviews at individual podiums under lighting designed for television shots. I tried to capture everything in eye-and-earshot while pleading with my iPhone to hold its charge. Angels stud Mike Trout was as giddy as you’d expect a 20-year-old MVP candidate to be as he spoke about playing with Albert Pujols and learning from the slugger about proper work ethic. Anaheim lefty C.J. Wilson chatted about his passion for photography with a few photojournalists. Rangers starter Yu Darvish and Nationals phenom Bryce Harper were the biggest draws. Darvish seemed at home giving responses in Japanese to questions from a throng of Japanese reporters. Harper wore Converse All-Stars and spoke softly, trying to play it cool while fighting back obvious feelings of authentic teenage excitement.

“If you had to go out on the town with one of your fellow All-Stars,” an attractive blonde in a colorful dress asked Cardinals third baseman David Freese at a certain point, “which of the players would you choose?”

“Chipper (Jones),” Freese, the National League’s Final Vote winner responded. “Just look at the guy.”

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Now I sit in the left-field auxiliary press box, built on a concourse not far from the new Royals Hall of Fame, taking in the Home Run Derby. It’s not even halfway through the first round and it’s already dragging, but there is a steady breeze blowing out to right and Kauffman has great energy. There’s simply no place I’d rather be.

And That Happened: Sunday’s Scores and Highlights

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Happy Memorial Day, everyone.

Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Blue Jays 10, Padres 1: Cavan Biggio had three hits, including his first career home run, giving the Biggio family 292 combined career homers. Lourdes Gurriel Jr. hit a homer too. He, his brother Yulieski and their father Lourdes Gurriel Sr. have a combined 299, depending on how much credence you want to give to Cuban stats from the 1970s-90s when dad played. No matter the exact number their dad was amazing, jack. He substantially outhit both Barry Bonds and Jason Giambi head-to-head in amateur play back in the day, even though he was older than Bonds and much older than Giambi. He would’ve been a certified stud in the majors. Vlad Guerrero Jr. had three hits on the day. He and his dad have a combined 2,610 hits now. Justin Smoak hit two homers. I have no idea if his dad ever hit any. For all I know he’s a dentist or a tool and die guy or something.

Can’t wait until the Jays call up Dante Bichette’s kid, Bo Bichette, and every recap of their games is about dads. Dads rule.

Mets 4, Tigers 3: The homer explosion in baseball over the past few years has drastically increased the percentage of runs scored via the longball. Which, as a guy who does recaps and tends to focus on the runs that are scored, I must admit it makes things somewhat . . . boring at times. Or at lease repetitive. But it is what it is, and if you write about what happens in games you gotta write about what, you know, happened.

Unless you’re the AP beat writer who covered this game, in which case you spend the first 178 words of a 500-word story talking about Todd Frazier dropping down a bunt against the shift. It was a pretty nifty bunt — it scored the Mets’ first run of the game — but given that two batters later Adeiny Hechavarría hit a three-run homer that brought the Mets back from behind and gave them what proved to be the game’s winning runs, it seems, I dunno, a bit unrepresentative. I get it. I really do. It’s more fun to talk about a bunt-against-the-shift in which the “long-time pro” “cleverly” pushed that punt into right field than it is the 10,000th home run of the past week, but I feel like you gotta give Hechavarría his props there before you go on about wily veterans doing wily veteran things. Anyway: New York takes two out of three from the Tigers and wins the sixth of seven overall.

Twins 7, White Sox 0: Jake Odorizzi tossed one-hit, shutout ball into the sixth, striking out nine, and the Twins’ powerful lineup continued to be powerful, with Max Kepler and Eddie Rosario each hitting three-run homers. Minnesota sweeps Chicago for the team’s seventh series sweep this year. They’ve won 11 of their past 12 games too and have built a big lead in their division because . . .

Rays 6, Indians 3: . . . Cleveland kinda stinks. Trevor Bauer‘s struggles continue. He coughed up four runs on five hits in six innings while the Rays’ bullpenning brigade shut Cleveland out until eighth, by which time Tampa Bay was up 5-0. Austin Meadows, meanwhile, led off the game with a home run and was 4 for 4 with three RBI and the Rays took three of four from the Tribe. Cleveland is now at .500, a full ten games — 10! — behind the Twins. I guess allowing the team to get worse in the offseason because they felt like the division was gonna be a cakewalk isn’t working out all that well for the Indians, huh?

Nationals 9, Marlins 6: On Friday I observed on Twitter that if the Marlins win streak were to continue against the Nats and Washington were to get swept out of this series that it’d be a mortal certainty that Dave Martinez would get fired. That hypothesis was not tested as the Nats have taken the first three games of this four-game set. Here Howie Kendrick homered, had three hits and drove in three. If you want to look for a the gray lining on this otherwise fluffy white cloud, note that while Washington built up a 9-0 lead, the bullpen coughed up six runs in the final two innings which is not what you want.

Dodgers 11, Pirates 7: Justin Turner had five hits and scored three times, Matt Beaty had four RBI, and Corey Seager homered and drove in two and Joc Pederson went deep as well. The Dodgers scored six runs in the sixth. Two of them came via back-to-back bases loaded plunkings. I guess what I’m saying is that the Buccos’ pitchers weren’t exactly sharp in this one. L.A. sweeps Pittsburgh in three.

Red Sox 4, Astros 1: Eduardo Rodríguez allowed a first inning run but that’s all he allowed in six innings of work as he outdueld Justin Verlander. The Sox didn’t exactly pummel JV — Rafael Devers homered but the other runs came on an error, a groundout and a sac fly — but they did enough. The win allowed Boston to avoid a sweep. The season series between these two is over, with Houston taking four of six. Wouldn’t be shocking to see them meet in the playoffs once again.

Brewers 9, Phillies 1: Brandon Woodruff allowed a solo homer in the sixth but was otherwise perfect — like, literally perfect; no hits, walks, runs or errors — in eight innings of work. If not for that dinger he’d almost certainly have come out for the ninth given that he was only at 97 pitches. No need for that here, of course, as the Brewers’ bats gave him nine runs of support. Ben Gamel had two homers, Hernan Pérez, Yasmani Grandal and Christian Yelich also went deep. Yelich’s was his major league-leading 21st home run on the year. Gamel now has four homers in his first year in Milwaukee. That puts him two homers behind Mat Gamel on the Brewers’ All-Time Gamel home run list.

Royals 8, Yankees 7: The Royals had a 7-1 lead after five and blew it, with a three-run ninth inning rally capped off by a two-run RBI single from Aaron Hicks forcing extras. Yankees reliever Jonathan Holder failed to live up to his name in the 10th, though, as he walked Billy Hamilton — and, really, who the hell walks Billy Hamilton? — who then did the obvious thing and stole second base. With two down in the inning Whit Merrifield came to the plate and scored Hamilton for the walkoff win.

Merrifield got an eat-the-third-baseman-alive bounce on this one, but sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good:

Reds 10, Cubs 2: Bad day for the Cubbies. Both because of the loss and because Kris Bryant — starting in right field — collided with center fielder Jason Heyward as the two converged to catch a fly ball. Neither caught it and a run scored but, more importantly, Bryant had to leave the game and now he’s on concussion watch. Nick Senzel had three hits and scored four times for the Reds. Eugenio Suárez finished with two hits and three RBI and Joey Votto banged out a couple of hits as well. Tanner Roark tossed five shutout innings and the Reds too two of three from the Cubs in Wrigley.

Rockies 8, Orioles 7: Colorado scored twice in the bottom of the ninth to come from behind and snag the walkoff win. The first run of the ninth came on a bases-loaded walk to Ian Desmond, which again, who walks Ian Desmond? The second run came on a sac fly from Tony Wolters which, hey, you load the bases and you don’t have much margin for error. Before all of that Nolan Arenado homered for the third straight game and Rockies starter German Márquez tripled and drove in three runs on the day. The triple was kind of a cheapie, if such a thing exists, as the O’s had pulled the outfield way in against him and he just lofted one to the wall and trotted in to third without a play. Colorado takes two of three from Baltimore.

Athletics 7, Mariners 1: Brett Anderson allowed one run while pitching into the seventh, leading the A’s to a three-game sweep of the M’s. Matt Chapman and Josh Phegley hit bombs. Oakland has won nine in a row. Though, actually, that winning streak could later be taken away because in the middle of it is a suspended game against the Tigers which they could end up losing when they finish it later this year. It’s the closest thing baseball has to time travel. 

Diamondbacks 6, Giants 2: Arizona came into this series on a five-game losing streak and swept the Giants in three. Here they sent San Francisco to its fifth straight loss. Ketel Marte homered and Eduardo Escobar had three hits. Rookie Mike Yastrzemski had three hits. I was at one of his minor league games a couple of years ago and a guy behind me said “ah, it’s Carl Yastrzemski’s son.” I didn’t have the heart to tell him it was his grandkid. Life comes at you fast and all of that, but jeez, Carl Yastrzemski is gonna turn 80 this summer.

Holy crap. I’ve seen a guy who is almost 80 play in person. He’s not the only one who’s old.

Angels 7, Rangers 6: Texas had a 5-1 lead heading into the seventh when the Angels put up a six-spot. Mike Trout homered early and then doubled in a run and scored on a wild pitch in the Halos’ big seventh. Two runs scored on wild pitches in that inning, in fact, both by Kyle Dowdy. L.A. took two of three from Texas.

Braves 4, Cardinals 3: This one has to hurt if you’re a Cards fan. St. Louis took a 3-0 lead into the ninth and Jordan Hicks came out to get the easiest of all saves. He couldn’t record a single out, though, and ended up being charged with three runs. The third run came when Ozzie Albies singled to conclude a ten-pitch at bat against Shelby Miller in which he fouled off pitch after pitch.  In the tenth Tyler Webb put two on — one via an unintentional walk — and then Mike Shildt called for an intentional walk of rookie Austin Riley to load the bases. Next batter up was Brian McCann who, yep, walked to force in the go-ahead run. Atlanta takes two of three from the Cards. They’ve won 12 of 16 overall. They’re a game and a half behind the Phillies.