Carl Crawford pulled off rehab assignment with mild groin strain

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Oh boy. Carl Crawford’s return to the Red Sox will be delayed yet again, as Evan Drellich of MLB.com reports that the high-priced outfielder was pulled from his minor league rehab assignment due to a mild left groin strain.

Crawford must be shut down for five days before the 20-day window on his minor league rehab assignment can be reset. Of course, he could miss more than five days if additional tests reveal anything serious. He is currently on his way back to Boston for evaluation.

This is the second setback for Crawford since January surgery to remove cartilage from his left wrist. The 30-year-old was diagnosed with a sprained ulnar collateral ligament in his left elbow in late April.

Crawford batted just .255/.289/.405 with a .694 OPS last season in the first year of a seven-year, $142 million contract. His attempt at redemption will have to wait a little bit longer.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.