The Anti-All Stars

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Every year Scott Miller of CBS Sports.com puts out his version of the Razzies to Major League Baseball’s Oscars. It’s his Anti-All Stars team, collecting the worst and dimmest the league had to offer at each position. His new one is out now.

Mariners fans and Yankees-haters will take note that despite all the early season crowing about Michael Pineda’s injury and the M’s winning the trade, Jesus Montero is the team’s starting DH:

Montero is one of only 10 DHs with more than 130 at-bats and, as a DH, he’s hitting .192 with two homers and 13 RBI. Throw in his ABs while catching, and this stat is more difficult to choke down than a mouthful of cauliflower: Montero collected exactly one (1) RBI in the entire month of June, in 23 games.

But at times like these I do remember something my old boss at the law firm used to say: anyone can lose a small case. It takes a great lawyer to lose a huge one.  You laugh, but the core of truth to that little quip is that you have to be pretty good to begin with to be put in a position to fail so spectacularly. That applies to face-planting major leaguers too.

Mickey Callaway will not be fired over his blowup at a reporter

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As you no doubt saw already, Mets manager Mickey Callaway had a bad day yesterday. After some testy exchanges with the media over his bullpen use, he blew up at Newsday reporter Tim Healey after Healey told Callaway that he’d see him tomorrow, which Callaway took as sarcastic. Then Jason Vargas unhelpfully piled on, walking toward Healey and threatening him with violence. Healy spoke to his Newsday colleague David Lennon and explained the whole thing here. He’s pretty even-handed about it.

Callaway was already thought to be on at least moderately thin ice as Mets manager given his team’s underachievement this year. Thin ice or not, it’s not unreasonable to say that his behavior yesterday is something that a lot of teams would think of as a fireable offense. At the very least leaders in other businesses would think that way if one of their public-facing employees treated a reporter who covered him in that manner. In addition to it simply being bad form, it raises questions about Callaway’s temperament and his ability to handle pressure and adversity.

The Mets, however, do not seem to consider the matter to raise to that level. While they offered apologies to Healey and vowed that that he will be welcome in the clubhouse — for which Healey was appreciative — Callaway will be back to work as usual today, with the Mets announcing this morning that he will hold his usual pre-game press conference at 4PM in advance of tonight’s game against the Phillies.

Tell me: if you’re the GM or owner of a team and your manager does that, do you keep him? What do you do?