Heavy workload catches up to Jonny Venters and his elbow

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Jonny Venters’ left arm may have finally succumbed to the strain of his heavy workloads, as the Braves placed the setup man on the disabled list with an elbow impingement.

David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal Constitution notes that there has never been any talk of Venters being hurt until now, but there have been signs within his performance dating back to late last season.

Venters was ridiculously good last year and the Braves rode him extremely hard, calling on the left-hander for a league-leading 85 appearances and 88 innings. He faded down the stretch, posting a 5.65 ERA in his final 15 games compared to a 1.10 ERA through 70 games.

He bounced back this season by allowing zero earned runs in April, but since May 1 he has a 6.08 ERA. That includes six homers and 18 runs allowed in 24 innings after Venters allowed a grand total of two homers and 19 runs in 88 innings last season. Of course, Venters also has 26 strikeouts in those 24 innings since May 1 and if he’s been able to do that while pitching through an injury … well, that’s pretty damn amazing.

Since the beginning of 2010 the Braves have called on Venters for 204 appearances, which is the most in baseball and no one else is above 193. He was ridden hard and put away wet.

Baseball seeking a second lab for MLB COVID-19 tests

MLB COVID-19 tests
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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reported last night that Major League Baseball is “actively pursuing an additional medical lab site to increase the speed and efficiency” of MLB COVID-19 tests.

The current setup — as planned by MLB and approved by the MLBPA as a part of the plan to play the 2020 season — is for all MLB COVID-19 tests to be sent to and processed by MLB’s PED testing lab in Salt Lake City, Utah. As you likely heard, there have been delays in the administration of COVID-19 tests and in the shipping of tests to Utah, but to date no one has reported that the lab itself has not been able to handle the tests once they’ve arrived there. If MLB is looking for a second lab site a week into this process, it suggests that their plans for the Utah lab might not be working the way they had anticipated.

The issues with testing have created unease around the game in recent days, with some players and team executives speaking out against Major League Baseball’s handling of the plan in the early going. Commissioner Rob Manfred, meanwhile, has responded defensively to the criticism.

Meanwhile, the New York Times reported this morning that, months into the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States still lacks testing capacity. From the report:

Lines for coronavirus tests have stretched around city blocks and tests ran out altogether in at least one site on Monday, new evidence that the country is still struggling to create a sufficient testing system months into its battle with Covid-19 . . .“It’s terrifying, and clearly an evidence of a failure of the system,” said Dr. Morgan Katz, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins Hospital . . . in recent weeks, as cases have surged in many states, the demand for testing has soared, surpassing capacity and creating a new testing crisis.

It’s less than obvious, to say the least, how Major League Baseball plans to expand capacity for MLB COVID-19 tests while America as a whole is experiencing “a new testing crisis” and a “failure of the system.” At the very least it’s less than obvious how, even if Major League Baseball can do so, it can do so ethically.