And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

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Phillies 9, Mets 2: Cliff Lee stood to lose yet another one, as he and the Phillies were down 2-0 entering the seventh, but three runs in each of the seventh, eighth and ninth innings saved his bacon. First win of the year for Lee.

Marlins 7, Brewers 6: On Tuesday Milwaukee beat Miami in ten so yesterday Miami returned the favor. I didn’t see if Ozzie Guillen unleashed an expletive-filled rant after this one too. Yes, I know they won. It could have been expletives of joy.

Pirates 6, Astros 4: Seven of eight for the Pirates who are quite happy being in first place. Michael McKenry and Pedro Alvarez drove in two runs apiece.

Orioles 4, Mariners 2: Chris Tillman made his first start of the year and was outstanding: Two runs — both unearned — on two hits in eight and a third. But, well, Mariners.

Blue Jays 4, Royals 1: This game looked boring based on the box score, so what I really want to know is whether the people of Canada viewed the Royals wearing hats with the camouflage logos as an act of international aggression.

Cubs 5, Braves 1: Can the Braves rewind the season, regain Randall Delgado’s big time prospect status and trade him for Zack Greinke then? I somehow feel like that would have been a good move and would have led to a better season. Homers for  Bryan LaHair, Jeff Baker and Anthony Rizzo.

Athletics 3, Red Sox 2: David Ortiz hit his 400th homer, but Oakland sweeps the Sox. Brandon Moss had three hits including a dinger. Overall he was 6 for 8 with five RBIs and three runs scored against his old club in this series.

Cardinals 4, Rockies 1: Adam Wainwright allowed one run over six innings on eight hits. I am contractually obligated to note that, because it was eight hits in six innings, those hits were scattered.

Indians 12, Angels 3: Ervin Santana was rocked like a hurricane, allowing eight runs on six hits in an inning and a third. Three-run homers by Michael Brantley and Casey Kotchman.

Yankees 4, Rays 3: Alex Rodriguez drew a bases loaded walk off Kyle Farnsworth, who was making his second appearance of the year. Joe Maddon after the game:

“Kyle Farnsworth is a big part of our present and our future. For us to get to the promised land, he’s got to perform well, which he shall. I’ve never seen him do that before …”

I guess Joe Maddon just met Farnsworth, like, yesterday.

Nationals 9, Giants 4: Madison Bumgarner got shelled, allowing seven runs on nine hits in five innings. The Nationals hit four homers and Ryan Zimmerman drove in three.

White Sox 5, Rangers 4: Kevin Youkilis worked Mike Adams for nine pitches in the bottom of the 10th inning with a man on and then served one to left field for the walkoff. The crowd cried “Yooooooouk!”  Youkilis is six for his last 14 with a homer and six driven in.

Padres 8, Diamondbacks 6:  Yasmani Grandal hit a two-run, pinch-hit homer. Four of his six hits have been home runs. Have we ever had a Three True Outcomes catcher before? I suppose Grandal has to take a walk before get on that subject, but let’s keep it in our back pocket. Jason Kubel hit a three-run homer.

Tigers 5, Twins 1: A lengthy rain/storm delay meant that rather than 100 degrees at game time it was 78 degrees. The Tigers seemed to like that, as Miguel Cabrera hit two homers and Justin Verlander tossed a complete game. This box score is sort of the platonic ideal of a 2012 Detroit Tigers game.

Dodgers 4, Reds 1: L.A. took two of three from the Reds and, with the Giants loss, regained first place in the NL West.

Minor League Baseball accuses MLB of making misleading statements

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Yesterday several members of Congress, calling themselves the “Save Minor League Baseball Task Force,” introduced a resolution saying that Major League Baseball should drop its plan to eliminate the minor league clubs and, rather, maintain the current minor league structure. In response, Major League Baseball issued a statement accusing Minor League Baseball of refusing to negotiate and imploring Congress to prod Minor League Baseball back to the bargaining table.

Only one problem with that: According to Minor League Baseball, it has been at the table. And, in a new statement today, claims that MLB is making knowingly false statements about all of that:

“Minor League Baseball was encouraged by the dialogue in a recent meeting between representatives of Minor League Baseball and Major League Baseball and a commitment by both sides to engage further on February 20. However, Major League Baseball’s claims that Minor League Baseball is not participating in these negotiations in a constructive and productive manner is false. Minor League Baseball has provided Major League Baseball with numerous substantive proposals that would improve the working conditions for Minor League Baseball players by working with MLB to ensure adequate facilities and reasonable travel. Unfortunately, Major League Baseball continues to misrepresent our positions with misleading information in public statements that are not conducive to good faith negotiations.”

I suppose Rob Manfred’s next statement is either going to double down or, alternatively, he’s going to say “wait, you were at the airport Marriott? We thought the meeting was at the downtown Marriott! Oh, so you were at the table. Our bad!”

Minor League Baseball is not merely offering dueling statements, however. A few minutes ago it released a letter it had sent to Rob Manfred six days ago, the entirely of which can be read here.

In the letter, the Minor League Baseball Negotiating Committee said it, “is singularly focused on working with MLB to reach an agreement that will best ensure that baseball remains the National Pastime in communities large and small throughout our
country,” and that to that end it seeks to “set forth with clarity in a letter to you the position of MiLB on the key issues that we must resolve in these negotiations.”

From there the letter goes through the various issues Major League Baseball has put on the table, including the status of the full season and short season leagues and implores MLB not to, as proposed, eliminate the Appalachian League. It blasts MLB’s concept of “The Dream League” — the bucket into which MLB proposed to throw all newly-unaffiliated clubs — as a “seriously flawed concept,” and strongly counters the talking point Major League Baseball has offered about how it allegedly “subsidizes” the minor leagues.

You should read the whole letter. And Rob Manfred should probably stop issuing statements that, it would appear, are easily countered.