David Ortiz hits career homer No. 400

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David Ortiz became the 49th player in big-league history to reach 400 homers when he took Oakland’s A.J. Griffin deep in the fourth inning Wednesday.

It was Ortiz’s 22nd homer of 2012, putting him into a tie for fifth place in the American League. The 36-year-old will be the AL’s starting DH in next week’s All-Star Game.

Ortiz’s Hall of Fame chances appeared next to nil a couple of years ago, but his big resurgence has put him back into the discussion. He has a chance at 500 career homers, and he turned in an outstanding five-year peak from 2003-07 in which he finished in the top-five in the AL MVP balloting every year. He also helped lead the Red Sox to World Series championships in that span.

Of course, there is the steroid taint, even if the only thing that ties him to it is that a couple of lawyers reportedly said his name was on the “anonymous list” of players testing positive in 2003.

Regardless, Ortiz is on pace for a historic season. He’s on pace to become the fifth different player in major league history to hit at least .300 with 40 homers and 100 RBI at 36 or older. Babe Ruth did it twice, Hank Aaron once, Andres Galarraga twice and Barry Bonds three times.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?