Selection Sunday: Your 2012 All-Star rosters are revealed…

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Major League Baseball is announcing the All-Star rosters for each league this afternoon during an hour-long special on TBS. We’ll update this post as the names come in:

The 2012 MLB All-Star Game is next Tuesday, July 10, at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Starters

C Mike Napoli
1B Prince Fielder
2B Robinson Cano
3B Adrian Beltre
SS Derek Jeter
OF Josh Hamilton
OF Curtis Granderson
OF Jose Bautista
DH David Ortiz

Pitching Staff

LHP Matt Harrison
RHP Felix Hernandez
RHP Justin Verlander
LHP CC Sabathia
LHP C.J. Wilson
RHP Jered Weaver
LHP Chris Sale
LHP David Price
RHP Joe Nathan
RHP Ryan Cook
RHP Jim Johnson
RHP Chris Perez
RHP Fernando Rodney

Reserves

OF Adam Jones
C Matt Wieters
DH Adam Dunn
1B Paul Konerko
SS Asdrubal Cabrera
3B Miguel Cabrera
DH Billy Butler
OF Mike Trout
OF Mark Trumbo
C Joe Mauer
SS Elvis Andrus
2B Ian Kinsler

*******

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Starters

C Buster Posey
1B Joey Votto
2B Dan Uggla
3B Pablo Sandoval
SS Rafael Furcal
OF Matt Kemp
OF Carlos Beltran
OF Melky Cabrera

Pitching Staff

RHP Clayton Kershaw
LHP Gio Gonzalez
RHP Stephen Strasburg
LHP Cole Hamels
LHP Wade Miley
RHP R.A. Dickey
RHP Lance Lynn
RHP Matt Cain
RHP Craig Kimbrel
LHP Aroldis Chapman
RHP Jonathan Papelbon
RHP Joel Hanrahan
RHP Huston Street

Reserves

SS Starlin Castro
1B Bryan LaHair
OF Jay Bruce
OF Carlos Gonzalez
2B Jose Altuve
OF Giancarlo Stanton
OF Ryan Braun
3B David Wright
C Carlos Ruiz
OF Andrew McCutchen
C Yadier Molina
SS Ian Desmond

MLBPA thinks all 30 teams will take a “file-and-trial” approach to arbitration

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There’s something interesting deep in Ken Rosenthal’s latest notes column. It’s about arbitration, with Rosenthal reporting that the players union believes that all 30 teams will take a “file-and-trial” approach to arbitration this winter.

If you’re unfamiliar with this, it breaks down thusly:

  • In mid-January, teams and players who are eligible for arbitration will exchange proposed salary figures. The player says what he thinks he’s worth based on comparable players of his quality and service time and the team will propose a lower counter-figure;
  • Generally, the parties then use these proposals as negotiable figures and eventually reach a compromise deal, usually near the midpoint between the two figures, avoiding arbitration;
  • If a deal cannot be reached, they go to an arbitration hearing and arbitrators pick one of the numbers. They CANNOT give a compromise award. It’s either the higher player’s number or the lower team number.

In the past, a handful of teams — most typically the Blue Jays, Braves, Marlins, Rays, and White Sox — employed a “file- and-trial” approach, meaning that they treated the figure exchange date as a hard deadline after which they refused to negotiate and stood content to go to a hearing. As more teams have adopted this approach, there have been more arbitration hearings. As Rosenthal notes, last year there were more hearings than in any offseason for the past 25 years. Now, the union thinks, every team will do this. If they do, obviously, there will be even more hearings.

There is certainly an advantage to file-and-trial for a team. It makes the player and the agent work harder and earlier in order to be prepared to negotiate with the club before the file deadline. It also makes them work a lot harder to come up with a defensible filing number given that, rather than merely being an opening salvo in an extended negotiation, it’s something that they will certainly have to defend in open court. It’s also simple hardball. Teams have greater resources than the players and the agents and it’s less painful for them to pay for lawyers and hearing prep and to conduct the actual hearing. There’s risk to the team, of course — they might lose and pay more than a settlement would’ve cost — but teams are obviously concluding that the risk is worth it.

The only question I have is, if the union is right and all 30 teams will now proceed this way, how was that decided? Everyone suddenly, after several decades of arbitration, simply decided to take the same approach? Or was there, I dunno, a meeting in which the strategy was coordinated? Inquiring minds want to know!