Sorry, Yankees fans. Bryce Harper likes D.C. just fine.

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The Washington Post’s Adam Kilgore has four pages of goodness on Bryce Harper today, and it’s pretty much a must-read. Among the topics Harper discusses are his fondness for D.C., how he would have majored in journalism had he gone to college and his intention to abstain from alcohol.

And he only referred to himself in the third person once.

A lot can change over the next seven years, but Harper seems authentic in his desire to stay with the Nationals:

“You look at Cal Ripken. You look at Derek Jeter. You look at all the greats that played for one team their whole career,” Harper said. “I want to be like that. I’ve always wanted to be like that. I’ve always wanted to play with that same team.”

And the article closes with a little dig at Harper’s former favorite team:

Before the Nationals played the Yankees in mid-June, Harper told his father, “I don’t want to be a Yankee. I want to beat them.”

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.