Ryan Doumit extension shows Twins still living in the past

16 Comments

This two-year, $7 million contract extension is a signing from 2002.

Ryan Doumit is exactly the kind of player a smart team would go year to year with. He is…

a) over 30
b) injury prone
c) below average defensively wherever he plays

Doumit’s career highs are 124 games, 431 at-bats, 15 homers and 69 RBI. He had his best season four years ago when he was 27. He was also very good last season, but it was in 218 at-bats. This year, he’s also been quite good so far, though we’re still talking about a .775 OPS. He had a .718 OPS eight days ago.

I like Doumit. His body wasn’t made to withstand the rigors of catching regularly, but the Twins seem to have carved out a great niche for him this year; he’s on pace to catch 60 games and DH in about 50 more. There’s a fair enough chance he’ll stay relatively healthy and maintain something close to that .775 OPS the rest of the way, and in Target Field, that makes him a fair asset.

But that’s 2012. He’s only going to be a worse bet going forward. The Twins were able to sign him to a one-year, $3 million contract as a free agent over the winter, and nothing that’s happened since has made him a better bet for age-32 and -33 seasons.

Ignoring for a moment the fact that the Twins seem to be working to keep together their probable 95-loss team, smart clubs don’t give out multiyear deals unless there’s real upside to them. Given his lack of a position, Doumit would have had to go on a serious tear for anyone to ante up even a two-year, $10 million offer to him this winter, and little in his history suggests it was likely to happen. Doumit suffering a serious injury that would have negatively affected his value headed into 2013 is a  much more likely scenario.

This is just one of those completely unnecessary multiyear deals we don’t see quite as often these days as we used to. Obviously, it’s not going to bankrupt the franchise if it doesn’t work out, but there also isn’t much to be gained. The Twins could have waited until the winter and made sure they still wanted him back.

Orioles CEO, brother agree to dismiss legal dispute

Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sports
0 Comments

Baltimore Orioles CEO John Angelos and his brother Lou have agreed to end their fight over a lawsuit in which Lou accused John of seizing control of the team in defiance of their father Peter’s wishes.

Lou Angelos sued John last year, claiming John took control of the Orioles at his expense. Georgia Angelos, their mother, also was named as a defendant.

In a Friday court filing in the case, John, Lou, Georgia and Peter Angelos called on “all claims, including all counterclaims and defenses, asserted therein be dismissed with prejudice in their entirety.”

“The Parties also withdraw and terminate all pending motions submitted in these actions,” the filing said.

Peter Angelos became the Orioles’ owner in 1993, but his public role has diminished in recent years and he turned 93 last year. According to the suit, he had surgery after his aortic valve failed in 2017.

Lou Angelos accused John of trying to take control of Peter Angelos’ assets and manipulating Georgia Angelos. The lawsuit was one of a handful of off-field issues looming over the Orioles this offseason. The team also has a lease at Camden Yards that expires at the end of the year.