The Clemens jury thought Brian McNamee was lying

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This seems pretty obvious given how the entire trial, for all of its length, was set up as a credibility contest between Roger Clemens and Brian McNamee. But it’s still pretty notable:

“Brian McNamee was not a strong enough witness to render a verdict of guilty against Roger Clemens,” juror Bradford Weaver told The Associated Press. He said that McNamee wasn’t credible for the jury because of a lack of “truthfulness.”

“The witnesses for the prosecution were, uh, how does one put it, kind of wanting, if you will. … It was quite lacking. If that’s what they were going to go with, then they should probably not have pursued the case in the first place if that’s all they had, you know.”

Jut remember this the next time someone says they won’t vote for Clemens for the Hall of Fame because he lied or holds up the Mitchell Report — sourced largely on Brian McNamee and the prosecution’s other drug-dealing, truth-impaired witness, Kirk Radomski — as some sort of damning indictment regarding player integrity.

Video: Ramon Torres hits little league home run in first at-bat of season

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The Royals recalled infielder Ramon Torres from Triple-A Omaha on Saturday. He didn’t get into a game until starting Thursday night’s game against the Rangers, batting ninth.

In the top of the second inning, facing Austin Bibens-Dirkx, Torres laced a single up the middle. Center fielder Delino DeShields charged in on it, attempting to keep Ryan Goins at second base, but the ball went right past his glove, through his legs, and nearly trickled all the way to the warning track. Goins scored easily and Torres was waved home, too. He managed to narrowly beat the throw, touching home plate with his left hand on a head-first slide.

The play was officially scored a single and a three-base error. Torres wasn’t credited with an RBI on the play. But at least the Royals got two runs out of it.