Jimmy Rollins has been on fire for the past month

5 Comments

Philadelphia’s decision to re-sign Jimmy Rollins looked like a mess two months into his three-year, $33 million contract, as the former MVP hit just .224 with one homer and a .558 OPS through 47 games.

At age 33 and coming off back-to-back sub-.400 slugging percentage seasons it was starting to look like Rollins’ power was gone, but instead he’s been an extra-base hit machine since then.

Rollins went 2-for-5 with a homer and a double last night and is now 38-for-110 (.345) with seven homers, 10 doubles, and two triples in his last 25 games. During that time he raised his batting average from .224 to .268 and his OPS from .558 to .734, both of which are right around his career marks of .272 and .760.

Whether or not that means the Phillies will eventually regret giving Rollins a three-year commitment remains to be seen, but as they try to claw their way back into the playoff picture his re-emergence along with Chase Utley’s impending return has to have fans feeling at least a little bit optimistic.

Chris Paddack loses no-hit bid in eighth inning vs. Marlins

Eric Espada/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Update (9:16 PM ET): Aaaaaand it’s over. Just like that. Starlin Castro led off the eighth inning with a solo home run to left field. That ends the shutout bid as well, obviously.

*

Padres starter Chris Paddack has kept the Marlins hitless through seven innings on Wednesday evening in Miami. The right-hander has allowed two base runners on a throwing error and a walk while striking out seven on 82 pitches.

The Padres’ offense provided Paddack with three runs of support, all coming in the fourth on Greg Garcia‘s RBI single and a two-run home run by Austin Hedges.

Paddack, 23, entered Wednesday’s start carrying a 2.84 ERA with an 87/18 K/BB ratio across 82 1/3 innings in his rookie campaign.

Among all 30 teams, the Padres are the only one without a no-hitter. They came into the league in 1969. The Marlins were last victims of a no-hitter on September 28, 2014 when Jordan Zimmermann — then with the Nationals — accomplished the feat.