Are the Cubs doing too much non-baseball stuff at Wrigley Field?

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Gordon Wittenmyer of the Sun Times makes the case that, after a homestand which saw spray-painted outfield grass thanks to multiple rock concerts at Wrigley Field, the Cubs’ management’s priorities are out of whack:

Players were diplomatic about the grotesque look of the field during that homestand and the perception that the use of the ballpark for every possible concert and paid yoga gathering looks more important than the baseball to the top business brass.

That’s right, yoga. Even as the rushed repairs to the Wrigley sod were struggling to take root, a photo was tweeted Sunday of what looked like hundreds of women stretching on yoga mats spread across the outfield grass.

It doesn’t help that the baseball brass has assembled the worst team in the majors to date.

There’s an element of classic false dichotomy here in that it certainly does not follow that a team trying to get extra revenue via non-baseball events is necessarily neglecting the team’s baseball needs.  Letting some bands play in Wrigley is not going to unduly harm a massive rebuilding project.

But even if Wittnmyer’s criticism is a bit overheated, it is true that allowing the grass at Wrigley to get messed up is poor form. Cubs fans have very little to cheer for at the moment. They should at least be able to go to a game and see a nice field.

The Dodgers do not have a general manager, but they have an assistant general manager

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LAS VEGAS — Farhan Zaidi left his job as the general manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers to become the president of baseball operations for the San Francisco Giants. While Dodgers president Andrew Friedman remains at the top of the baseball operations department, Zaidi’s departure has left the Dodgers without a general manager. It happens. It also happens that the Dodgers do not plan to replace Zaidi with a new general manager any time soon. They just said so last week.

They do, however, have an assistant general manager now. It’s Jeff Kingston, late of the Seattle Mariners, where he served as Jerry Dipoto’s assistant. Now he is an assistant with no one, nominally, to assist. Seems like some sort of dividing by zero error, philosophically speaking, but we’ll just assume it’ll sort itself out.

Two less cosmic takeaways from this: 1. Kingston is an analytics guy who has typically advised the wheeler-dealer — Dipoto — so it’s fairly safe to assume he’ll do that in Los Angeles too; and 2. that a team is happy to proceed without a general manager should tell you where general managers, well, in general, stand in this age of title inflation in baseball front offices.

I imagine that, after some time in the organization, Kingston will be named the actual general manager with no real change in his duties, further underscoring that, in this day and age, the title of GM is like the value of a Zimbabwean dollar.