Are the Cubs doing too much non-baseball stuff at Wrigley Field?

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Gordon Wittenmyer of the Sun Times makes the case that, after a homestand which saw spray-painted outfield grass thanks to multiple rock concerts at Wrigley Field, the Cubs’ management’s priorities are out of whack:

Players were diplomatic about the grotesque look of the field during that homestand and the perception that the use of the ballpark for every possible concert and paid yoga gathering looks more important than the baseball to the top business brass.

That’s right, yoga. Even as the rushed repairs to the Wrigley sod were struggling to take root, a photo was tweeted Sunday of what looked like hundreds of women stretching on yoga mats spread across the outfield grass.

It doesn’t help that the baseball brass has assembled the worst team in the majors to date.

There’s an element of classic false dichotomy here in that it certainly does not follow that a team trying to get extra revenue via non-baseball events is necessarily neglecting the team’s baseball needs.  Letting some bands play in Wrigley is not going to unduly harm a massive rebuilding project.

But even if Wittnmyer’s criticism is a bit overheated, it is true that allowing the grass at Wrigley to get messed up is poor form. Cubs fans have very little to cheer for at the moment. They should at least be able to go to a game and see a nice field.

Michael Young has some opinions on brushback pitches

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A lot of people in the comments to Bill’s posts on the Urena-Acuña posts last night and in response to my rant about it in the recaps and on Twitter this morning, have talked about how silly writers don’t understand the culture of baseball and how pitchers have been brushing back batters for years. One guy said that old players would laugh at me for my naive notions about such matters and that, to make it as a pitcher, you have to brush guys back and reclaim the inside of the plate and make the hitter uncomfortable in the box.

I think that’s all b.s. obviously, but they are right about one thing: I don’t play baseball and baseball players probably know this stuff better. With that in mind, I’m going to defer to seven-time All-Star Michael Young’s thoughts on the matter of brushbacks and purpose pitches:

If you think you know more about this than Michael Young, you now have his Twitter handle and can tell him yourself.