Ryan Zimmerman has pain in shoulder, may need a break

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Mark Zuckerman of CSNWashington.com’s excellent “Nats Insider” page provides the money quote:

“I’ve been hitting for a while here [in the big leagues], and I don’t miss fastballs the way I’ve been missing fastballs,” Ryan Zimmerman said Saturday after watching his batting line fall to .218/.285/.305 . “So it’s frustrating, but I’ve just got to continue to do my treatment and stuff, and hopefully it will improve and we’ll get to that. But if things keep going the way they’ve been going, we’re going to have to do something.”

The 27-year-old third baseman is likely to get a cortisone shot in his ailing right shoulder early this week. If that doesn’t take care of the discomfort, he may be placed on the 15-day disabled list. The approaching All-Star break (July 9-12) could mean fewer missed games.

Washington moved to 41-28 with Saturday’s 3-1 win over the Orioles. Zimmerman would be surely be missed, but the first-place Nats are better served getting him as healthy as possible for the stretch run.

Zimmerman is in the Nationals’ starting lineup on Sunday against Baltimore, playing third and batting third.

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.