Daniel Bard tells Red Sox he no longer wants to be a starter

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Daniel Bard’s move from the bullpen to the rotation is officially over after 10 starts, as the right-hander told the Red Sox that he no longer wants to be a starter.

“I know I can be a good starter, but I already know I’m a great reliever,” Bard explained to Joe McDonald of ESPN Boston.

McDonald reports that Bard talked recently with general manager Ben Cherington, who’s in agreement with the move back to the bullpen. Of course, now he must actually pitch well enough at Triple-A to deserve a call-up and Bard has struggled some as a reliever for Pawtucket since his demotion.

Bard had a 5.30 ERA in 10 starts, showing decreased velocity with more walks (36) than strikeouts (34) in 54 innings. By comparison he had a 2.87 ERA and 213/77 K/BB ratio in 198 career innings as a reliever, ranking among the most dominant setup men in baseball from 2009-2011.

Whether or not you think the idea of giving Bard an opportunity to start was a sound one it seems fairly obvious that the Red Sox could have handled the situation better and it’s even more obvious that Bard simply didn’t pitch well in the rotation. Now the question is whether he can rediscover his old, overpowering raw stuff and how quickly he’ll be back in the Red Sox’s bullpen.

Cubs shut Brandon Morrow down for remainder of 2019

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Cubs reliever Brandon Morrow, on a rehab assignment as he works his way back from elbow and forearm issues, suffered a setback and has been shut down for the remainder of the 2019 season, MLB.com’s Jordan Bastian reports.

Morrow, 35, hasn’t pitched since July 15, 2018. The right-hander inked a two-year, $21 million contract with the Cubs in December 2017 but has been unable to stay healthy. When he did pitch last year, he was excellent, limiting the opposition to five runs on 24 hits and nine walks with 31 strikeouts and 22 saves in 30 2/3 innings.

Morrow is likely done as a Cub. He has a vesting option for 2020 worth $12 million. The details aren’t publicly available but it presumably won’t vest. The Cubs can instead buy him out for $3 million, making him a free agent.