Cardinals activate Jon Jay, Matt Carpenter from disabled list

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Slowly but surely the Cardinals are starting to get healthy. Or at least healthier.

St. Louis has activated Jon Jay and Matt Carpenter from the disabled list, sending down Matt Adams and Adron Chambers to make room on the roster.

Jay has been out since injuring his shoulder on May 14, but went 3-for-8 with a homer on a brief minor-league rehab assignment at Triple-A to convince the Cardinals he’s ready to start in center field again.

Carpenter missed the past month with a strained oblique muscle, but capped his rehab assignment at Double-A by going 3-for-3 with a homer yesterday. He’ll resume playing first base and third base after hitting .288 with an .875 OPS in 39 games before the injury.

Adams struggled in his first taste of the majors, hitting .244 with a .669 OPS and ugly 24/5 K/BB ratio in 27 games, but the 23-year-old first baseman remains in the Cardinals’ plans after consistently putting up big numbers in the minors. It might not be until next season, however, as the Cardinals have no shortage of capable bats if/when everyone is healthy.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.